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Finding The Cheapest Place To Finance A Car in Michigan

Get financing to purchase a new or used car. Start the online approval process now.

Finding the cheapest place to finance a car isn't easy. With so much advice and information available online and from other sources, you could get easily confused. However, you have to find the best deal on your next auto loan. Where should you go to find the best rate on a car loan?

Finding The Cheapest Place For An Auto Loan Is Different For Everyone

Places to refinance a car

Those who have great credit can walk into a dealership and get an interest rate of around 2 percent just for applying. It may be possible for those with great credit to do the same when applying for a loan through their credit union. If you don't have good credit, the cheapest place to find an auto loan in metro Detroit may be through a bad credit lender. Ultimately, it may be easier to get a loan through your dealer.

Here at Nobody Knows Credit Better, our Michigan car dealerships not only have a great selection of new and used vehicles for you to choose from, but we also have helped hundreds of people get the auto financing they need to buy a car, truck or SUV regardless of their credit score.

Dealers Would Certainly Love Your Business

No dealership is going to turn you down for a loan if you can show a good faith willingness to pay the loan back. Borrowers can easily get a loan if they have the following:

  1. A Solid Job History
  2. A Steady Income
  3. A Cosigner Who Can Vouch For The Borrower

While you don't need a cosigner to get approval for a loan, it will help if you have low credit scores and want to get the best possible interest rate.

Saving money on a car loan is the proactive way to maximize purchasing power.

Fortunately, you don't have to look far to get the best car loan for cheap. Nobody Knows Credit Better great financing options to buy a new or used car, and our metro Detroit car dealership has a great selection of vehicles.

For months, and maybe even years, you've been saying to yourself, "I'm going to get a metro Detroit car loan today!" Now is the time to take that first step and work on driving away with your new vehicle by the end of the day.

Where Else Can You Go To Get A Cheap Loan?

You can always go online to compare loan rates from online lenders or local banks before you apply for credit through a dealer. However, you should be aware that you could pay up to 15 percent interest on a personal loan or up to 29 percent if you are thinking about financing your car loan through a credit card. This makes a dealer loan look good in comparison even if you have to pay 5 or 6 percent interest.

Finding the cheapest place to finance a car means that you have to shop around a little bit. The good news is that your dealer is going to work with you to find you the best rate whether it is through a traditional lender, a bad credit lender or through the dealer itself.


Why Refinance Car Loan in Malaysia

Places to refinance a car

I saw this advertisement at Ambank @Puchong branch.

What is AMCB Car Refinancing Scheme? I thought we are only refinance housing loan. Why we need to refinance car loan? The word of ‘Refinance’ always links me to ‘lower interest rates save more money’ and ‘use other people’s money to grow money faster’. Does the car refinancing scheme meets the same objectives too?

Here are some of the benefits of AMCB car refinancing scheme:

  • To get fast cash
  • Ownership in JPJ registration card remains
  • Insurance NCD / NCB rates remains

If you are interested to know how much money you can get by refinancing your car, try Ambank Refinance Car Loan Calculator. The results will show you the loan particulars, expenses/charges and cash amount to you.

Places to refinance a car

Notes: Refinancing Interest Rates below 4.8% p.a. are negotiable. Please visit the nearest Ambank branches and negotiate for the best interest rates.

Basically, the interest charged (4.8%) is not an attractive rate. It might be even higher than your initial car loan package. Therefore, it doesn’t make sense if you refinance car loan to save interest. Unless, you need extra money urgently to:

  • Help your child to pursue education at overseas
  • Grab a golden investment/business opportunity
  • Restructure your financial planning by reducing the car loan installment
  • and etc.

Anyway, car refinancing is still an option to source for extra money.

7 thoughts on “Why Refinance Car Loan in Malaysia”

Hello, I am Isha Nasri from Puchong here in Kuala Lumpur, If you need loan then contact standard loan firm because that is where I got my loan from a week ago without credit check and low interest rate of 3% without any form of collateral and no cosigner. If you know you need loan and you can pay back then contact them with this email [email protected]

hi, i have need to refinance my car…i need help

I am Mohammed Rasheed from Kuala Lumpur here in Malaysia, If you need loan I advise you to contact Abu Abdullah Loan Firm because I just got a loan from them a week ago without credit check and low interest rate of 3% and no cosigner, You can reach them with this email [email protected]

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11 Things to Know Before You Lease a Car

Monday, May 23, 2016

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Places to refinance a car

is a freelance writer and quantitative marketing consultant. Hannah founded the site Unplanned Finance.

Places to refinance a car

Nearly one quarter of new cars in America are sold under lease agreement, and low monthly payments entice buyers who want to drive new cars, but don’t want to deal with a large cash outlay.

Lessees don’t build equity in their vehicle, but for the right person, a lease can be a good option. These are things you need to know before you consider a lease.

1. The best way to think about a lease

It’s best to think of a lease as a pay for use contract. A lease allows you to pay for the depreciation you put onto a vehicle at a reasonable interest rate. You get to drive and depreciate a vehicle for a certain period of time then you can walk away.

Due to higher markups, higher interest rates and additional fees, leasing tends to be an unfavorable financing mechanism, but if you don’t care about owning the car, a lease may be a good option for you.

As a lessee, you will drive the car during its most rapid depreciation phase, so in the long run, continuously leasing a vehicle is the most expensive way to drive, but if you always want to drive a new car, leasing can be a low hassle way to make that happen.

2. Leasing affects your credit score

Taking on a lease affects your credit the same way that taking on a car loan affects your credit. Applying for a lease triggers a credit inquiry on your report, which has a small adverse effect on your credit score. Taking on a lease increases credit utilization which also adversely affects your credit score. Over time your credit utilization will fall, and timely payment history will cause your score to increase again.

Leases are considered installment loans, and having a high utilization rate on installment loans does not have as much of an adverse effect on your credit score as having high utilization on credit cards or other forms of revolving credit. As with any form of credit, late or skipped lease payments drag down your score

Manufacturers and salespeople shroud leasing in complex jargon. To understand the terms of your lease, these are the definitions you need to know.

  • Capitalized Cost: The price of the vehicle. This could be MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price), or it could be reduced based on your negotiations.
  • Capital Cost Reduction: This is a down payment. The most favorable leases (for those who don’t intend to purchase at the end of the lease) should not include a capital cost reduction unless it’s an incentive.
  • Residual Value: This is the estimated value of the car at the end of the lease. The higher this price is relative to the capitalized cost, the more favorable it is to lease a car. Cars.com keeps a database of residual values on file that you can use to understand if you’re getting a fair residual value.
  • Factor, Money Factor or Rate: This is the interest rate of your loan, but it’s not expressed as an annual percentage rate. The number expressed needs to be multiplied by 2.4 to get to an APR. For example a 1.35 money factor is a 3.24% interest rate. LeaseHackr.com keeps an up to date list of “official” factors (column entitled MF) that you can use in negotiations. Interest rates on leases range from 2-3 times as high as interest rates on traditional car loans, but it is possible to negotiate this rate.

Unlike car loans, leases come from car manufacturers rather than banks. However, this doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to negotiate a lease. Anyone who intends to lease should try to drive down the capitalized cost, and people with good credit should also look to reduce or even eliminate the money factor. Small fees like documents fees, tire fees and more can be waived completely if you take the time to negotiate.

Even if a dealership advertises a “Manufacturer’s Leasing Special”, you should negotiate the terms of the lease. Salespeople depend on getting you to drive away in a new car, so consumers hold upper hand in negotiations.

One advantage of leasing a vehicle is that it shifts depreciation risk from the customer to the manufacturer. A down payment (or a capital cost reduction) shifts the risk back onto the customer. In a lease, a down payment is a form of pre-payment. If you terminate the lease before the end of the lease period (if your car is totaled or stolen), you lose the benefit that the down payment purchased. Putting no money down is an important strategy for keeping the lease in the lessee’s favor.

Leasing yields lower monthly payments compared to buying using traditional financing, but some of the monthly cash flow advantage is lost by increased insurance costs. To protect themselves financially, lessees should purchase “Gap Insurance” in addition to traditional car insurance.

Gap insurance covers the difference between the actual cash value and the amount owed on a lease. As soon as a lessee drives the car off the lot, the car is worth less than the lessee owes on their lease. If a car is totaled or stolen during a lease period, you need to be able to buyout the lease early, and gap insurance allows you to do that. Gap insurance should be purchased through a traditional insurer, and adds anywhere from 3-10% to the traditional cost of insurance.

Every lessee runs into at least three substantial fees during the course of their lease. The first fee is an acquisition fee (alternatively called a financing fee). This fee is not a down payment, but it runs anywhere from $500 for basic compact cars to nearly $1,000 for luxury vehicles.

Dealerships also charge a $300-$900 Delivery Charge which covers the cost of the vehicle being delivered to the dealership lot. Lessees need to be prepared to pay this fee upfront, but some companies try to sneak a second delivery fee into the contracts. The second delivery fee can be negotiated to zero.

The last fee every lessee will encounter is either a disposition fee or a purchase option fee. These fees run between $300-$400 depending on which option you choose. When a lease ends, you will pay a fee to the dealership unless you negotiate it away at the outset.

In addition to these larger fees, many lessees will run into mileage overage fees which range from $.15 per mile for basic vehicles to $.30 for luxury vehicles. Most people drive more than their lease allows, and these extra miles cause additional depreciation on the vehicle. Since a lease is a “pay for what you use agreement”, it’s fair to pay for those extra miles. Of course you can avoid overage fees by limiting the amount you drive or by purchasing the car at the end of the lease.

You should negotiate smaller fees like advertising fees, tire fees, document fees, vehicle preparation fees down to zero.

Lessees bear the financial burden of repairs and maintenance on their leased vehicles. Some dealerships offer free tire rotation and oil changes, but the lessee has to pay for other maintenance. New cars shouldn’t require much maintenance, but accidents, chipped paint and broken windshields need to be paid for, and longer lessees may need to buy new tires while they own the vehicles

Turning in a leased vehicle early is akin to defaulting on a car loan. Your credit will take a hit, and you will still owe money. However, it is possible to “sublet” your car through websites like SwapALease and LeaseTrader.

If your lease is about to end, you’ll have to decide whether or not to purchase the car or return it. If you want to buy the vehicle, you may be able to negotiate the buyout price. If you have the cash on hand to pay for the vehicle, and the purchase price is lower than an equivalent used car, you can purchase the vehicle outright and sell it for instant equity. If you have to obtain financing, the additional fees may erase any favorable pricing you obtained.

If the vehicle is worth less than the purchase price at the end of your lease, you should probably walk away from the vehicle or attempt some strong negotiations. Of course, the beauty of a lease is that the termination of the lease means that you can hand the keys back to the dealer and move on.

Anyone with midterm vehicle needs (only needing a vehicle for a few years) may find that a lease is a good value and a good fit for their lifestyle. Likewise, anyone who loves driving new cars and doesn’t mind having a monthly payment may enjoy leasing long term.

Continuously leasing vehicles is more expensive than “driving a vehicle into the ground,” but many people don’t mind that they get what they pay for. People who enjoy driving newer, fancier cars may find that leasing can be a reasonable lifestyle, especially if they can easily afford the payment.

Avoid leasing if you’re trying to drive as inexpensively as possible. The low monthly payments are enticing, but leasing is the most expensive way to drive in the long run. Leasing has high interest rates and high fees. If you can’t afford the monthly payments associated with owning a new car, consider buying used or choosing a basic model. Both of these methods end up being cheaper than leasing.

If you drive a lot, or if you frequently drive in poor conditions, you’re a bad candidate for leasing. The additional depreciation may mean that you’re left paying extra fees at the end of your lease. Additionally, anyone seeking to own a vehicle should pursue paying cash or taking out a traditional loan rather than leasing.

If you decide to purchase your vehicle instead of leasing it, it is best practice to get pre-approved for your auto loan before heading over to the dealership. [Disclosure: LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.]We recommend starting with LendingTree. There are hundreds of lenders on this platform. After filling out your application, you will be able to see real interest rates and approval information at once.

Keep in mind, some lenders will do a hard pull on your credit and this is normal within the auto lending space. Multiple hard pulls only count as one pull, so it is smart to have all your hard pulls done at once, which LendingTree’s tool can do for you.

Places to refinance a car

Hannah Rounds is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Hannah at [email protected]

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Advertiser Disclosure: MagnifyMoney is an advertising-supported comparison service which receives compensation from some of the financial providers whose offers appear on our site. This compensation from our advertising partners may impact how and where products appear on the site (including for example, the order in which they appear). To provide more complete comparisons, the site features products from our partners as well as institutions which are not advertising partners. While we make an effort to include the best deals available to the general public, we make no warranty that such information represents all available products.

How to Get a Car Loan With Bad Credit in 2017

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Places to refinance a car

is a freelance writer and quantitative marketing consultant. Hannah founded the site Unplanned Finance.

Places to refinance a car

Part I: Auto Loan Options for Bad Credit

Places to refinance a car

Part II: Shopping for auto loans with bad credit

Places to refinance a car

Part I: Auto Loan Options for Bad Credit

Shopping for vehicles with bad credit can be like walking through a minefield. It is possible to get across safely and into the car of your dreams, but it will require careful thought and strategy if you want to avoid overpriced lemons, crooked loans and outright fraud.

In this guide, we explain how to find the best deal on an auto loan if you have bad credit. We dig into the pros and cons of financing through credit unions, banks, personal loans and dealers. Finally, we bring to light the biggest auto financing scams and show you how to avoid them.

We geared this guide toward young adults with a short credit history; immigrants who have not established credit; anyone with a history of late payments, credit collections and bankruptcy; and someone who has suffered from identity theft, divorce or other negative credit events.

How bad credit impacts your cost of borrowing

When you have poor credit, it will be harder for you to find affordable auto financing but not impossible. You should be prepared to face higher interest rates, for one thing, and you may be required to have a co-signer or put down a larger down payment in order to get approved.

Most people think of their credit score as a single number, but when it comes to auto lending, that’s not entirely true. Most auto lenders care a lot more about your history with auto loans than about any other part of your credit history.

A good credit score isn’t just about interest rates. Bad credit may mean that you’re ineligible for a loan at any interest rate. The single most important factor in getting approved for an auto loan is whether or not you’ve had a repossession in the last year. People with recent repossessions will struggle to find a reputable lender. During bankruptcy proceedings, you may struggle to find financing.

However, shortly after completing bankruptcy, you’re likely to get flooded with auto loan offers. Lenders know that you can’t file bankruptcy for another eight years, so they may consider you a better credit risk.

If you have bad credit, you might find a lender to approve your loan, but you’ll likely pay a high interest rate. Just how much does bad interest cost? A borrower with a credit score below 500 will expect to pay $9,404 for a $16,000, 61-month car loan, according to interest rate estimates from Experian. That’s 4.1 times the interest that a prime borrower can expect.

Places to refinance a car

People with bad credit face dramatically higher interest rates than borrowers with good credit. According to the Experian State of the Automotive Finance Market, used car borrowers with credit scores between 601 and 660 had average interest rates of 9.88% compared with the 16.48% rate faced by borrowers with scores between 501 and 600.

With such high interest rates, it’s usually best to avoid taking out an auto loan until you have decent credit. However, if you finance a car with bad credit, try to follow these rules:

  • Use a significant down payment. We recommend putting down at least 20 percent on any vehicle purchase. A larger down payment not only results in a smaller loan, but you’ll pay less in interest over time. Additionally, cars depreciate in value rapidly once you purchase them. By putting down 20 percent, you’re making sure you’re only financing what the car is actually worth.
  • Do your research first. Consult the Kelley Blue Book to determine the vehicle’s value, and have the vehicle inspected by a trusted mechanic before you buy it.
  • Avoid loan terms that are longer than four years. The average subprime borrower purchasing a used vehicle takes out a loan for over five years (61.6 months), according to Experian. Long loans may mean you’ll pay more in interest and possibly face costly repairs before you finish paying off the car.
  • Borrow only what you can afford to pay back. A good rule of thumb to follow is that the total cost of your monthly car expenses shouldn’t be more than 10 percent of your gross monthly income
  • Demand fair terms. If you have bad credit, you can’t expect a great interest rate on your loan, but you can expect fair terms. Don’t accept a loan with prepayment penalties or mandatory binding arbitration clauses.

These rules can help you protect yourself against predatory lenders and unaffordable loans.

Credit union auto loans for bad credit

The fastest growing issuers of auto loans are credit unions. According to Experian, at the start of 2015, credit unions held just $215 billion in open auto loans. Today they hold $286 billion.

Navy Federal Credit Union and USAA are two national credit unions that will work with people who have bad credit. Please note, neither credit union guarantees loan approval. However, they both offer courses to help you improve your credit, and they have car-buying programs to help you find a vehicle in your budget.

Places to refinance a carNavy Federal Credit Union

  • Down payment required: None
  • Loan terms: 12 to 96 months on new vehicles; up to 72 months for used vehicles
  • Credit score requirements: No minimum score. More likely to be approved if you have a low debt-to-income ratio and few major derogatory marks (such as collections or repossessions).
  • Full review

Navy Federal Credit Union is open to members of any branch of the U.S. military, civilian and contractor personnel, veterans and their family members. They do not have specific credit minimums for their loans, but they consider debt-to-income ratios and credit history.

Unlike most banks, NFCU will help you if you have negative equity in a vehicle. They lend up to 125 percent of the new vehicle’s value. Navy Federal Credit Union approves borrowers for both private party and dealership loans, and they have free online courses to help you make the best buying decisions.

Places to refinance a carUSAA

  • Auto loan APR: 7.74% and up for borrowers with poor credit
  • Down payment required: Varies based on credit history and income
  • Loan terms: 12 to 72 months for borrowers with poor credit
  • Credit score requirements: Not available

USAA is open to members of any branch of the U.S. military and their family members. USAA determines loan eligibility based off of your credit history, your income, and your other debt obligations. You may not qualify for a loan if you have a credit score below the mid 500s, a recent repossession, or other derogatory marks.

USAA does not always require a down payment for a vehicle purchase, but they advise putting down at least 15 percent on vehicle purchases.

Banks and subprime auto financing companies

It’s getting much tougher for people with poor credit to borrow high-interest, high-risk subprime loans, as many of the largest banks in the U.S. have started to shy away from the product.

Ally Financial, the nation’s largest auto lender, limited their subprime lending to just 11.6 percent of their total lending in 2017. In 2015, the nation’s third largest auto lender, Wells Fargo, announced their intentions to limit subprime auto lending to less than 10 percent of their portfolio.

Of the five largest auto lenders in the U.S., only Capital One continues pursuing the subprime auto market. They lend nearly one-third (31%) of their portfolio to consumers with credit scores less than 620.

You can gain pre-approval before you start shopping for a vehicle. This is the best way to shop for an auto loan if you have bad credit. You do not want to pursue auto financing from the scam artists at a dealership.

Below, are auto financing companies and banks that will issue loans directly to people with poor credit.

Places to refinance a carSpringboardAuto.com

  • Loan size: $7,500 to $45,000
  • Interest rate: 8% to 18%
  • Loan terms: 24 to 69 months
  • Down payment required: Minimum $250
  • Credit score required: 500
  • Vehicle requirements: 2009 or newer, mileage less than 125,000

SpringboardAuto.com is a direct-to-consumer, online auto lending platform. SpringboardAuto.com specializes in loans to people with imperfect credit histories. SpringboardAuto.com uses a soft credit inquiry to determine your loan eligibility. A soft inquiry allows you to shop for a vehicle loan without hurting your credit.

Places to refinance a carRoadLoans.com

  • Loan size: $5,000 to $75,000
  • Interest rate: Up to 29.99%
  • Loan terms: 12 to 72 months
  • Down payment required: Dependent on multiple credit factors.
  • Credit score requirement: There is not a minimum score required, however applicants are required to complete a credit application. Credit score is not the sole factor, but it plays a key role in determining approval and loan terms.
  • Income requirement: $1,800 monthly minimum income

RoadLoans.com is a company owned by subprime auto lending giant Santander. Santander has suffered from more than its fair share of criticism in the subprime auto lending market. According to a March report by Moody’s Investors Service, the bank failed to verify incomes of 8 percent of borrowers whose loans it later bundled up into bonds and sold to investors. From a consumer’s perspective, it’s important that lenders verify your income before approving you for a loan because it’s never a good idea to borrow more money than you can reasonably afford to repay.

The scandals make this a reluctant recommendation, but the loans offered by RoadLoans.com are direct to consumer. That means you’ll see better rates and fair terms on the loans.

Places to refinance a carCapital One

  • Loan size: $7,500 to $40,000
  • Interest rate: 3.24%+
  • Loan terms: 36 to 72 months
  • Vehicle requirements: Must work with one of 12,000 nationwide dealerships. Vehicle must be a 2005 model or newer with less than 120,000 miles.
  • Down payment requirement: Must have a 10 percent down payment
  • Income requirement: $1,800 per month
  • Full review

Of the five largest bank lenders, only Capital One continues to expand their subprime auto lending operations. Capital One uses a soft credit pull to help you understand how much you may qualify for. Once you qualify for a loan, Capital One issues a “blank check,” which you can fill out at one of over 12,000 nationwide dealerships.

Places to refinance a carAutopay.com

  • Loan size: $2,500 to $100,000
  • Interest rate: 1.99% to 22%
  • Loan terms: 24 to 84 months
  • Credit score requirements: 600 minimum score
  • Income requirements: $2,000 month income

Autopay.com is an online lender that specializes in auto lending for people with fair credit. You need a credit score of at least 600 and an income of at least $2,000 a month to qualify for a loan on Autopay.com.

Once you’re serious about car shopping, take some time to get the best auto financing. When you apply for an auto loan, you’ll usually see a “hard credit inquiry” on your credit report. This will drag your credit score down by a few points. To limit the damage of hard credit inquiries, do all your comparison shopping inside a 30-day window. Any auto loan applications that you submit within 30 days will count as just one hard credit inquiry on your score.

To make comparing interest rates easy, we recommend comparing rates from LendingTree.com, the parent company of MagnifyMoney, and AutoPay.com. If you’re not pleased with those loan offers, apply directly through the credit unions or auto financing companies listed above

Once you know your numbers, you might think it’s time to start car shopping, but that isn’t quite right. It’s important to get pre-approved for an auto loan first.

Loan pre-approval allows you to walk into a car-buying situation knowing that you’re looking for price and quality, not financing. It frees you to focus on the final price of the vehicle and the value of your trade-in. Even more important, pre-approval can keep you from getting scammed by shady dealers.

If you’re planning to buy from a private-party seller, pre-approval is even more important. Most individuals won’t wait around for weeks or months for financing to come through. Without a pre-approval, you’re unlikely to get the deal.

Every bank, auto financing site, and credit union listed above helps customers gain pre-approval. After you find the best interest rate, a bank will verify your income, debt and credit history. Once that is complete, the bank will send you a conditional commitment letter. As long as the vehicle you purchase meets the bank’s requirements, you can complete the purchase with minimal hassle.

Using personal loans for auto financing

If you’ve had a car repossessed in the last few years, you may struggle to qualify for any auto loans. But you may still qualify for a personal loan. This is one of the few situations where a personal loan makes sense to finance a car.

Personal loans also make sense if you expect to pay off the loan in less than a year. For example, you may want to take out a loan as a “bridge loan” while you work out the private party sale of a vehicle. If you’re underwater on a vehicle, you may need a personal loan to help you pay off your original loan upon the sale of your older vehicle.

Most people using personal loans will want to look for an unsecured personal loan. Unsecured means that you don’t have an asset to back up the value of the loan. Interest rates on unsecured personal loans tend be higher than those of auto loans. If you have bad credit, the interest rates can be as high as 36%, according to the MagnifyMoney comparison tool.

If you own an insured vehicle, you may consider a secured personal loan. These also have high interest rates, but those are somewhat tempered by the collateral. Of course, if you sell your vehicle or otherwise ruin it, you have to repair the vehicle or pay back the loan right away.

These are some of the best options for personal loans if you have bad credit:

Places to refinance a carAvant

  • Amount: up to $35,000.
  • Rates: 9.95% to 35.99%
  • Loan terms: 24 to 60 months
  • Upfront fee: 0.95% to 4.75%
  • Full review

Avant specializes in unsecured personal loans for people with OK to bad credit. The interest rates are high, but these are one option for people with bad credit. We recommend these loans if you’re borrowing a small amount or for a short time and you cannot qualify for better terms.

Places to refinance a carOneMain Financial

  • Loan size: $1,500 to $25,000
  • Interest rates: 15.99% to 35.99%
  • Loan requirements: May require a vehicle as collateral or a co-signer (or both)
  • Full review

OneMain Financial specializes in secured loans for people with bad credit. The loans carry super-high interest rates, but they may be the best rates available if you have bad credit. When you apply for a loan through OneMain Financial, you must complete the loan in a local bank branch.

Places to refinance a carBest Egg

  • Amount: Up to $35,000
  • Rates: 5.99% to 29.99%
  • Term: up to 60 months
  • Upfront fee: 0.99% to 5.99%
  • Full review

Best Egg is one of our highest rated personal loans for avoiding fine print. If your credit score is at least 660, you could get approved. It is very difficult to get approved below 660.

Places to refinance a carThe truth about dealer financing

Even with the best credit score, dealer financing is rarely a good deal. This is especially true if you buy a vehicle with an in-house loan office that claims, “No Credit, No Problem!”

Used car dealerships only work with a few auto lenders, so they can’t guarantee that you’ll get a great rate. On top of that, some auto financing companies let dealerships mark up the loan and keep the additional interest as a commission.

Even in the best-case scenarios, dealer financing can also get you focused on the wrong numbers. Salespeople will focus on the monthly payment amount rather than the price of the vehicle you’re buying and the value of your trade-in. To get the best possible deal, you want to know the price you’re paying for the vehicle.

Part II: Shopping for Auto Financing With Bad Credit

Infographic: Essential Car-Buying Checklist

4 numbers to check before you buy a car

If you’ve struggled with credit in the past, or you’re a new borrower, then you need to know your numbers before you shop for a vehicle. Knowing these numbers will help you make a wise purchasing decision.

  • Credit score
    • You can check your credit score for free from a number of websites. The scores you see on the free websites won’t exactly match the scores auto lenders use. They will use FICO® Auto Scores 2, 4, 5, 8, 9, which can be purchased from myFICO.com for $59.85. Don’t like what you see? Don’t hire a shady “credit repair” company. Our ebook will explain how to repair your credit on your own, for free!
  • Interest rates
    • Many banks and credit unions use soft credit inquiries to help you estimate your auto loan interest rates. You can compare rates at Lendingtree.com to see what rates you might qualify for.
  • Your budget
    • We recommend following the 20/4/10 rule: Put at least 20 percent down, finance the car for less than four years, and have a payment of less than 10 percent of your income. You can use the Auto Affordability Calculator to help you determine a budget.
  • Current car’s value
    • If you’re driving a paid-off car, you have an asset that can go a long way in making your new car more affordable. Many dealerships will let you trade in your old vehicle as a down payment on a newer vehicle. Use Kelley Blue Book to negotiate a fair trade in value.

Places to refinance a carDealer financing scams and how to avoid them

When you shop for credit at a place that advertises, “No Credit? No Problem!” the financiers smell desperation. They may stick you with a bad loan, or they may outright break laws. These are just a few scams you might encounter from dealer financing operations. According to Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety (CARS) Foundation president, Rosemary Shahan, “In general, buy-here pay-here financing is just overpriced junk. […] We always recommend that people avoid financing at the dealership. There are just too many games that they can play.”

Yo-yo financing is when dealers allow you to sign a contract at one rate, and then unilaterally change the terms of the contract a few weeks after you’ve taken home the vehicle. They usually claim that the “financing fell through” and you need to sign a new contract at a higher interest rate. This is an illegal practice, but it may require costly litigation to prove.

To protect yourself, keep copies of all loan documents you sign, and don’t drive away with a car until you’ve paid for it.

Mandatory binding arbitration clauses

Most dealer financing includes forced arbitration clauses. In this clause, customers waive the right to a jury trial and must settle disputes in private arbitration. Dealers can delay arbitration or fix outcomes by paying private companies.

Shahan claims, “When you go to arbitration, you’re almost always going to lose. The companies have them in their pockets.”

Some loan officers stuff contracts with overpriced extras with dubious value. For example, they may include service contracts, extended warranties and unclear fees. When you do the math on these products, they’re rarely worth the money.

If you plan to take out a loan for more than your car is worth, you may have to buy Guaranteed Auto Protection (GAP) Insurance. This insurance covers the difference between the amount of your loan and the value of your car. It helps you pay off your loan if your car gets totaled. Generally, you’ll want to buy this (and all other car insurance) on your own.

Your old vehicle is an asset, and you should get close to Kelley Blue Book value for it. Some shady dealers will value your vehicle at pennies on the dollar. Because of a low valuation, you may be stuck financing a larger amount. A private sale will always yield the biggest bang for your buck, but that might be inconvenient for you. Even so, you need to negotiate for a fair trade in value.

Salespeople often focus on monthly payments rather than true affordability. Because of that, you may lose track of the price you’re actually paying for a vehicle. When buying a vehicle, getting a loan pre-approval will help you focus on the price rather than the monthly payment.

Selling mechanically unsound vehicles

Some used car dealers sell vehicles that don’t work to unsuspecting customers. Even worse, some dealerships sell unsafe vehicles that are branded as “certified pre-owned.” Used vehicles can be sold as certified pre-owned despite the fact that they have unrepaired safety recalls.

The Federal Trade Commission requires banks to check for unrecalled safety recalls, but buy-here pay-here lots don’t have to. Unless you check for safety recalls yourself, you might buy a vehicle that the manufacturer has called unsafe.

In general, once you’ve purchased the vehicle, you can’t return it, and you have to pay for repairs on your own. Before you buy a used vehicle, have a trusted mechanic inspect it. Additionally, check the VIN number at SaferCar.gov. This database will tell you if the car you want to buy has unrepaired safety recalls.

Some dealers fail to transfer a title within a timely manner. That opens you up to credit and legal risks. Car dealers should explain exactly when you should expect to see the title. Ideally, you can walk out of a dealership with an assigned title or certificate of transfer.

Car buyers do not have many ways to protect themselves from shady dealers or financiers, but if you know your rights, you can protect yourself from the most damaging problems.

  • Title rights. Every state has different rules surrounding title transfers, but in every state you have the right to a title when you purchase a vehicle. You should know exactly when to expect the title before you pay for a vehicle. When you buy from a private party, you should expect to transfer the title immediately regardless of state laws.
  • Insurance rights. A bank may legally require you to purchase vehicle insurance. However, you have the right to purchase the insurance on your own. Take advantage of this right; you’ll save a ton of money.
  • Refuse financing. Despite high-pressure sales tactics, you don’t have to take out financing from a dealer. You can take out a loan from a bank or credit union instead.
  • Contract rights. If you’ve signed a valid contract, a financing company cannot change the terms. They cannot force you to sign a new contract with less favorable terms.

Don’t work with dealers that don’t respect these rights. If you’re caught with a company that does not recognize your rights, complain to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau right away. The CFPB helps customers connect directly with financial institutions and responds to issues within 15 days.

Since vehicle buyers don’t have many “inherent” consumer protection rights, you protect yourself.

Only work with private parties or dealers that allow you to do the following:

  • Inspect used vehicles
    • A trusted mechanic can help you evaluate the mechanical soundness of a vehicle. Most people cannot tell a lemon from a peach, and they need the help of a mechanic to determine the value of a vehicle.
  • Run the VIN through SaferCar.gov
    • Don’t buy a car that has an unrepaired safety recall. These vehicles are dangerous. If a vehicle has a scratched-out VIN, don’t buy it. It’s too big of a risk.

      Avoid mandatory binding arbitration

  • Avoid mandatory binding arbitration
    • Most loans include a jury waiver clause or an arbitration clause. These clauses keep costs down for the bank, but the clauses are nonbinding. That means you have the right to appeal if you believe the bank or credit union committed fraud. Dealerships and dealer financing often require mandatory binding arbitration. That means you can’t appeal even if the dealer defrauded you with an unsound vehicle or an unclear title or other problems.
  • Pay before you drive away
    • A salesperson should not push you to take home a vehicle before you’ve paid for it. When they do that, they are almost certainly going to stick you with a higher vehicle price, or worse financing terms. Pay for your car first, then drive it away

Understanding your auto loan contract

  • Mandatory binding arbitration – This means you cannot sue your financing company. Instead, all disputes are resolved through a private arbitration company paid for by the dealer. DO NOT work with companies that require mandatory binding arbitration.
  • APR – This is the effective interest rate that you’ll pay on your loan.
  • Dealer preparation fees – Unless a dealer has provided custom preparations for you, this is a bogus fee designed for the dealer to make extra money.
  • Origination fee – This is the fee that the bank charges to originate the loan. It’s usually baked into the cost of the loan.
  • GAP insurance – Guaranteed Auto Protection Insurance covers the difference between the value of your vehicle and the value of your loan. You may be required to purchase this if you have negative equity. However, you can buy this insurance on your own.
  • Extended warranties – An extended warranty means that the manufacturer will cover the cost of repairs for a limited time. Most of the time, the warranties cost far more than the repair costs down the road.
  • Loan term – This is the length of time required for you to pay your loan. We recommend keeping loan terms to less than four years.
  • Loan-to-value (LTV) – The LTV expresses the value of your loan relative to the value of your vehicle. We recommend a starting LTV of 80 percent or less. If you have an LTV greater than 100 percent, then you rolled negative equity into the loan.
  • Negative equity – When your vehicle is underwater (you owe more than the vehicle is worth), you have negative equity. It’s possible to buy a new car with negative equity, but we advise against it.
  • Trade-in value – A vehicle trade-in can help you go a long way toward having a 20 percent down payment for your vehicle. During a trade-in, a dealer pays you for your old vehicle. You can almost always get more money by selling your vehicle in the private market, but it’s not very convenient. A dealer will make a trade-in offer that you can either accept or reject. Use Kelley Blue Book to determine whether you’ve received a fair trade-in value for your old vehicle.

Getting a co-signer for an auto loan

People with bad credit stand to gain a lot from having a co-signer on their auto loan. You can expect to qualify for a larger loan with lower interest payments, but asking someone to co-sign an auto loan is no small request.

A co-signer agrees to make your car loan payments if you are unwilling or unable to fulfill your loan obligations. If you skip a loan payment, you ruin your co-signer’s credit. For that reason, we generally discourage most people from becoming a co-signer. However, spouses who share finances may find that co-signing the loan is helpful for the family finances.

A co-signer can help you qualify for lower interest auto loans by providing one of three attributes:

  • Their income may help you meet the minimum requirements for an auto loan.
  • Their credit history is better than yours.
  • They have a lower debt-to-income ratio than you.

If you’re a freelancer or small business owner, a co-signer may also offer the required income stability that puts you into a lower risk category.

When you ask someone to co-sign a loan, remember that they are putting their credit on the line for you. If you don’t think that you can make your loan payments, then you’re putting them at risk. Be careful about the request

How to refinance from a bad credit auto loan

If you’ve taken out a high-interest auto loan, you should be on the lookout for refinancing opportunities. Most people who make on-time auto loan payments and reduce their credit card debt will find their credit score increase over time. If you’re starting with a very bad credit score, you can see over a 100-point improvement within 12 to 18 months of good credit behavior.

Once your credit score is in the mid 600s, take a serious look at refinancing opportunities. People with credit scores between 601 and 660 paid an average of 9.88 percent on used auto loans, a full 6.6 percent lower than the rates paid by people with subprime credit.

Refinancing an auto loan is easy compared to shopping for initial car financing. That’s because the shopping process includes known variables. You know the value of your vehicle and the amount of financing you’ll need. You also know the interest rate you need to beat. If your current vehicle is underwater (you owe more than your car is worth), you may need to bring cash to the table to complete a refinance.

We recommend shopping for loan refinances through our parent company, LendingTree. LendingTree compares dozens of auto refinance offers all at once and shows you the best rates in the market. You can also compare offers to those you might find through myAutoloan.com or SpringboardAuto.com.

Can I buy a car before declaring bankruptcy?

Before you declare bankruptcy, you can buy a vehicle up to the motor vehicle exemption amount in your state. Unless the vehicle is expensive, you’ll probably get to keep the car during bankruptcy proceedings. However, your auto loan won’t be discharged in bankruptcy. You need to pay the auto note as required. If you include an auto loan in bankruptcy proceedings, you won’t be allowed to keep the vehicle.

Can I buy a car after declaring bankruptcy?

Most people struggle to find auto financing after they’ve declared bankruptcy but before the bankruptcy is discharged. Courts even frown upon buying a car with cash during bankruptcy.

Once your bankruptcy is discharged, you can expect subprime lenders to flood your mailbox with auto loan offers. This is because lenders know you can’t declare bankruptcy for another eight years. However, it’s not necessarily a great time to finance a vehicle. Waiting a year or two for your credit to repair will allow you to finance a vehicle at a much lower interest rate.

What happens if I don’t get approved for an auto loan?

If you don’t get approved for an auto loan, ask the bank why they didn’t approve you. Do you have insufficient income? Do you have a recent auto repossession on your credit report? Do you lack credit history? Perhaps your debt-to-income ratio is too high.

Once you know why you didn’t get the loan, you can work on fixing the problem. This guide can teach you how to improve your credit score for free. It’s also important to note that just because one bank didn’t approve your loan, doesn’t mean you can’t get a loan. Our parent company, LendingTree, helps consumers shop for multiple loans all at once. Using LendingTree or other loan aggregation sites can help you find a bank willing to lend to you.

Of course, you could resort to dealer financing, but we don’t recommend it, even as a last resort.

Do I need a co-signer for a bad credit car loan?

Some banks will not lend to you unless you have a co-signer (also known as a co-applicant). The co-signer agrees to pay for your loan if you stop making payments. If you have low income and bad credit, you’ll probably need a co-signer. However, most others can get around having a co-signer. If possible, we recommend avoiding loans that require a co-signer.

If you currently own a car, you can opt to trade in your vehicle at a dealership. When you trade in your vehicle, the dealership offers credit against the purchase of a newer vehicle. Many people use trade-ins in lieu of down payments.

Dealerships offer less money for a trade-in than you would get in the open market. However, private sales can be complex, and they often take a long time. Because of that, trade-ins can be a win-win for dealers and buyers. The key to a winning trade-in is not getting ripped off. Use Kelley Blue Book to determine your vehicle’s value, and use the KBB value to negotiate a fair trade-in price.

If you owe more than your car is worth, you need to be extra cautious about a trade-in option. When you trade in a vehicle with negative equity, you’re automatically starting your new loan underwater. To stop the cycle of negative equity, you need to find a vehicle that you can pay off in less than four years.

Should I ever get financing from a buy-here, pay-here lot?

How can I know if a vehicle is a lemon?

Most people cannot tell the difference between a high-quality and a low-quality used vehicle. We recommend paying a trusted mechanic to inspect the vehicle before you buy it. If a seller won’t let a mechanic inspect the vehicle, you don’t want to buy from them.

You should also personally check the nationwide vehicle registry to be sure a vehicle does not have any unrepaired safety recalls. If the vehicle has unrepaired safety recalls, don’t buy it. It’s not safe to drive.

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Hannah Rounds is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Hannah at [email protected]

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Advertiser Disclosure: MagnifyMoney is an advertising-supported comparison service which receives compensation from some of the financial providers whose offers appear on our site. This compensation from our advertising partners may impact how and where products appear on the site (including for example, the order in which they appear). To provide more complete comparisons, the site features products from our partners as well as institutions which are not advertising partners. While we make an effort to include the best deals available to the general public, we make no warranty that such information represents all available products.

Why You Shouldn’t Take Out an 84-Month Auto Loan

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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Ralph Miller is a writer who specializes in personal finance. As a strong consumer advocate, his writing offers a balanced view so you may make a realistic and sound choice when it comes to your personal financial decisions.

Part I: The Truth About Long Term Auto Loans

Part II: Understanding the auto loan process

Part I: The Truth About Long Term Auto Loans

When poor credit and high monthly payments are keeping you from buying the car you need, it may be tempting to lower your payments by signing up for a 72-, 84- or even 96-month term loan. Before you do, it’s important to know exactly what you’re signing up for — and be sure you’re making the right move for your finances.

Lower car payments with longer terms mean you’re paying more in interest, and loan companies love this for obvious reasons. Evidently, consumers do, too. In the first quarter of 2017, new car loans with terms from 73 to 84 months represented 34.9 percent of all auto financing. For used cars, they represented 19.5 percent.

Most of the big dealerships offer 84-month financing through banks like Ally Financial or Santander. Local dealers are also known to offer longer term financing offers, typically through third party financing companies, credit unions, or insurers like Nationwide.

Let’s take a look at what you’re getting into when you choose a longer term on your auto loan…

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Note: These numbers don’t include tax, title, or registration, which will only increase the amount of interest you pay if you include those costs in the total amount you borrow. These numbers also don’t include any down payment or trade-in you may have, which will decrease the amount of the loan and the amount of interest paid.

5 reasons long auto loan terms are a bad idea

  1. More interest. As you saw in the example above, you’re going to pay a lot more interest on a car loan with a longer term. If you spend more than those average amounts on a new or used car, the amount of interest you pay is only going to go up.
  2. Your loan will outlast your warranty. Most manufacturer’s warranties last 3 to 5 years, so you’ll be paying on your loan for an additional 2 to 4 years after the warranty runs out. Which leads to…
  3. New car payment, old car repair costs. Think about this. You’re going to be making your car payment for the next seven years. With a shorter term, you’d have paid off your vehicle before you started paying for costly repairs. But with an 84-month loan, you’re going to be paying both your monthly loan and the inevitable repair costs that come with an older vehicle.
  4. Negative equity. Stretching out a car loan over time means you’re paying less on the principal and more in interest with each payment. As your vehicle continues to decline in value each year, you’ll continue to be upside-down on your loan unless you made a significant down payment.
  5. Unable to refinance. If you’re upside-down on your loan, meaning you owe more on your loan than the vehicle is worth, you’ll be unable to refinance your loan.

When it makes sense to get an 84-month auto loan

  • You absolutely can’t afford a car any other way. This is probably the number one reason why people choose longer terms on their auto loan. An 84-month auto loan will lower your monthly payment, allowing you to purchase that vehicle that otherwise would be just out of reach. However, you should consider whether you’re borrowing too much if you can’t afford the monthly payment on a shorter term loan. Can you compromise by buying a used car at a lower price point? Or, could you scrounge up more money for a larger down payment to reduce the amount you need to borrow?
  • You have higher interest debt to worry about. If you have other loans at a higher interest rate, it may make sense to get a lower monthly loan payment so you can free up capital each month. That way, you can use the extra money you’re saving to pay down higher interest loans.

How to make the most of a long-term loan

  • Compare rates. Companies like LendingTree and MagnifyMoney allow you to compare auto loan rates from multiple lenders. So you can make sure you’re getting the best deal and a low APR. (Disclosure: LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney)
  • Buy now, refinance later. If you’re absolutely bent on getting a certain car now, you can always choose to refinance down the road, when your financial situation improves.
  • Make a larger down payment. Getting out of a bad car loan can be difficult when you’re upside-down. By putting more down on your vehicle up front, you’ll prevent this from happening while saving money in interest and avoiding gap insurance.
  • Buy used. The average used car payment is $145 less than the average new car payment, according to Experian, so save yourself some money with a more affordable monthly payment by buying a used vehicle.

5 tips to lower your costs of borrowing

  1. Keep your car after it’s paid off. Once your car is paid off, keep it — especially if it’s reliable and gets good gas mileage.
  2. Make an extra payment each month. By paying an extra $100 per month, you could save $1,819 in interest and own your car in a little over five years when you buy a $30,534 new car with an 84-month loan. When it comes to that $19,126 used car, you’d save $1,598 in interest and pay it off in under five years.
  3. Compare rates. Shop around for the best rates, and get multiple offers from lenders to compare. A difference of 3 percent on your interest rate could save you $3,689 on that 84-month new car loan of $30,534 and $2424 on that $19,126 used car.
  4. Buy used. With used car payments an average of $145 less than new, you’ll save a lot when you buy used over new.
  5. Don’t finance extras. Pay up front for your license, tax, and registration. If you purchase an extended warranty or prepaid maintenance package, don’t finance those into your loan either.

Part II: Understanding the Auto Loan Process

Most people do it backward — they go shopping for a car first, then shop for a loan. When you do this, you’re making yourself vulnerable to high-pressure sales associates and putting yourself at a disadvantage when it comes to financing your vehicle.

When you get pre-approved for auto loans before heading to a dealership, you have an understanding of how much money you can qualify for, so you’re not shopping for vehicles that are too expensive. You also have a loan amount and interest rate to compare any other financing that’s offered to you.

How to get pre-approved for an auto loan

You can get pre-approved with a bank, credit union, auto finance company, or dealership finance center.

  1. Research rates online. Many sites, like MagnifyMoney’s parent company Lendingtree.com, will offer auto loan rates online. It’s a good idea to check them out so you have an idea of what’s being offered. Keep in mind that your creditworthiness will affect the rates you’re able to qualify for, and the credit score for an auto loan is a little different from other loans.
  2. Gather your documents. Get everything you need together before calling or taking a visit to your lender. This may include:
    1. Personal information, like your name, address, phone number, and Social Security number.
    2. Employment information, like your employer’s name and address, your title and your salary
    3. Financial information, including what kind of credit you have available now, your current debts and your credit score.
  3. Apply. Choose a few lenders and apply online or in person for your auto loan.
  4. Get a quote. Once you’ve completed the loan application and you’ve been pre-approved, you’ll receive a loan quote showing how much you qualify for, the interest rate and the length of the loan. You can take this to the dealership with you when you’re shopping and use it as a negotiating tool.

For more information on your loan choices, check out these resources:

Getting a cosigner for an auto loan

Having a co-signer can help you qualify for a loan you wouldn’t otherwise get. As long as the co-signer has a strong credit score, it’s likely you’ll qualify for a better interest rate using a co-signer too. And making on-time payments on this type of loan will help build your credit.

The drawbacks of having a co-signer are that the cosigner is responsible for the loan if you fail to pay. If this happens, chances are you’ll negatively affect your relationship with whoever cosigned for you. If that’s a friend or family member, (which it usually is) look out! Think twice about the responsibilities of having a co-signer, and the importance of paying back the loan, so you don’t leave your cosigner on the hook for money you borrowed.

Understanding your auto loan contract

Here are some key terms you’ll need to know when it comes time to signing a contract.

  • Sticker Price – A manufacturer’s suggested retail price that is printed on a sticker and affixed to a new automobile
  • Purchase Price – This may be less than the sticker price, and is the price you agree to purchase the vehicle for from the dealer.
  • Amount Financed – This is how much money you are borrowing and the amount you’ll pay interest on. Be careful about financing extras into your loan, as doing so may put you upside-down in the vehicle.
  • Down Payment – An amount of cash provided at the time of vehicle purchase and credited toward the purchase price of the vehicle to reduce the amount financed.
  • Interest Rate – The amount of money charged for loaning money, expressed as a percentage of the Amount Financed.
  • Fixed-Rate Financing – With a fixed rate, your interest rate will never change and you’ll always pay the same amount each month.
  • Variable Rate Financing – A variable interest rate is subject to change and may increase your monthly payment amount.
  • Monthly Payment Amount – This is how much you’ll pay each month.
  • Finance Charge – This is a fee, charged by the lender, for extending you credit.
  • Annual Percentage Rate (APR) – APR includes both the interest and fees expressed as a percentage, making it easier for you to compare multiple loan offers.
  • Term — This is the length of the loan expressed in months, usually 36, 48, or 60.
  • Extended Warranty Contract – An extended warranty covers the vehicle beyond the manufacturer’s warranty for a fee.
  • Guaranteed Auto Protection (GAP) – If you owe more than the car is worth, you’ll be offered GAP insurance, which will cover the difference if the vehicle is lost, stolen, or totaled.
  • DMV Fees – These may include title, license, and registration.
  • Title — The legal document proving ownership of a vehicle.

Here are few traps dealers can use against you. Know them so you can protect yourself and avoid getting ripped off

  • Rate mark ups. Your dealer is getting financing from a bank, and they mark up the rate, charging you an extra percentage or two when you could have just gone directly to the bank in the first place.
  • Yo-yo financing. The dealer says you’re approved and you drive away. Later, the dealer says you were denied, and asks for a larger down payment or increases the interest rate. If you refuse, you must return the vehicle, and the dealer may try to keep any deposit you made.
  • Falsified credit application. Sometimes dealers will falsify information on your credit application, like increasing your income, to help you qualify for a vehicle you wouldn’t otherwise qualify for. Be sure to check your credit application before signing.
  • Selling extras. Whether it’s GAP insurance, prepaid maintenance, or extended warranties, the dealership is going to try to upsell you on some extras to rack up the charges and, if you agree to roll it into your financing, increase the amount of interest you pay. Be careful when selecting these extras and make sure you understand what you’re getting and know it’s worth the expense.
  • Negative equity financing. If you owe more on your trade-in vehicle than it’s worth, dealers will try to offer you a deal where you roll the negative equity into your new auto loan.
  • Extra charges. Look over your contract for any extra charges. One way to spot these is if they’re pre-printed on the contract. Many of these charges are not required and can be negotiated down.

Using an auto loan to improve your credit

If you’re working toward improving your credit, there are two rules you must follow. And while going from good to excellent isn’t easy, there are a few ways your auto loan can help you improve your score.

  • Payment history. On-time payments are 35 percent of your FICO score, so paying your auto loan on time will help with your payment history.
  • Credit mix. Because having a mix of different types of credit (home loans, personal loans, credit cards) makes up 10 percent of your FICO, throwing an auto loan in there will certainly improve your mix.
  • Report to credit bureaus. Make sure the lender you’re working with reports your payments to the three major credit bureaus. Beware of “Buy here, pay here” dealerships who may or may not report your payments to the credit bureaus.

And if you want to prevent your credit from getting worse, make sure you don’t do any of the following:

  • Make late payments on your auto loan.
  • Stop making payments and get sent to collections or have your car repossessed.
  • Include your car loan in your bankruptcy (if applicable).

When it makes sense to lease vs. buy a car

If you’re taking out a longer term loan in order to lower the monthly payment, you may want to consider leasing as an option. There are some things you should know before leasing a car, especially if you’re comparing leasing to buying. And while leasing isn’t for everyone, it can be a viable alternative to taking out an 84-month lease. in fact, according to Experian data, the number of people taking out a lease continues to increase.

“Another reason why we see consumers increasingly choose to lease, is they’re generating around $100 lower payment. And the biggest difference is in non-prime, [where there’s a] $109 difference between a loan and a lease,” says Melinda Zabritski, senior director of sales at Experian.

The Pros and Cons of Leasing a Car

  • Lower monthly payment. The payment to lease is an average of $100 less than buying according to Experian’s 2017 report.
  • Warranty coverage. The average lease lasts 36 months and during that time, you’ll have full warranty coverage for anything that goes wrong with the vehicle.
  • Mileage penalties. Most leases have a limit on how many miles you can drive (10,000 per year for an average lease), and you’ll pay for additional miles you drive unless you secure an extra-mileage or unlimited-mileage lease upfront.
  • Wear-and-tear fees. Nicks, scratches, stains — they all amount to extra wear and tear on your leased vehicle, and you’ll pay for them at the end of your lease. So if you’re hard on your vehicles, buying may save you some money here.

The Pros and Cons of Buying a Car

  • Ownership. Once you’ve paid off your loan, the vehicle is yours.
  • No mileage penalties. Drive as much as you like, you won’t pay a dime for “extra” miles you drive like you would with a lease.
  • Maintenance and repairs. With ownership comes responsibility. In addition to being responsible for the maintenance, once the manufacturer’s warranty expires, you’ll be responsible for all any repair costs needed. That’s why some people consider buying an extended warranty.
  • Loss of value. Although you won’t pay fees for wear and tear, or extra miles you put on the car, those things will still lower the value of the vehicle when it comes time to sell it. And every year you own it, the value of the vehicle is likely to continue to decrease.

The Bottom Line: Is an 84-month auto loan ever a good idea?

In our opinion, no. Most people make the choice to take out a longer term auto loan in order to lower their monthly payments to afford the car they want. ‘Want’ being the operative word here. Chances are, you can purchase a less expensive car that would give you the same monthly payment. Although it’s difficult, putting your emotions aside can really help you make a financially sound decision when it comes to choosing the terms of your auto loan. If you know this is an area where you struggle, ask for help from a friend or family member who can be the voice of reason.

If you do choose to go with an 84-month auto loan, just understand that you’ll be paying more interest on your loan. And hopefully, you have a good job for the next seven years to help you pay for it.

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Ralph Miller is a writer at MagnifyMoney. You can email Ralph here

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Advertiser Disclosure: MagnifyMoney is an advertising-supported comparison service which receives compensation from some of the financial providers whose offers appear on our site. This compensation from our advertising partners may impact how and where products appear on the site (including for example, the order in which they appear). To provide more complete comparisons, the site features products from our partners as well as institutions which are not advertising partners. While we make an effort to include the best deals available to the general public, we make no warranty that such information represents all available products.

Auto Loan Interest Rates and Delinquencies: 2017 Facts and Figures

Thursday, August 17, 2017

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is a freelance writer and quantitative marketing consultant. Hannah founded the site Unplanned Finance.

Led by a prolonged period of low interest rates, consumers now have a record $1.2 trillion 1 in outstanding auto loan debt. Despite record high levels of issuance, the auto lending market shows signs of tightening. With auto delinquencies on the rise, consumers are facing higher interest rates on both new and used vehicles. In particular, over the last three years, subprime borrowers saw rates rise faster than the market as a whole. MagnifyMoney analyzed trends in auto lending and interest rates to determine what’s really going on under the hood of automotive financing.

  1. Overall auto delinquency is on the rise, and the first quarter of 2017 saw near record levels of new auto loan delinquency rates. 54
  2. Interest rates are on the rise, with average new car loan rates up to 4.87%, 60 basis points from their lows in late 2013. 2
  3. The average duration of auto loans (new vehicles) is a record 67.37 months, reducing the monthly payment impact of higher interest rates. 31
  • Average Interest Rate (New Car): 4.87% 2
  • Average Interest Rate (Used Car): 8.88% 3
  • Average Loan Size New: $29,314 4
  • Average Loan Size Used: $17,180 5
  • Median Credit Score for Car Loan: 706 6
  • % of Auto Loans to Subprime Consumers: 31.34% 7
  • Total Subprime Market Value: $229 billion 8
  • Average Subprime LTV: 113.4% 9
  • Average Interest Rate (New Car): 11.05% 10
  • Average Interest Rate (Used Car): 16.48% 11
  • Average Loan Size (New Car): $28,099 12
  • Average Loan Size (Used Car): $16,026 13
  • % Leasing: 25.9% 14
  • Total Prime Market Value: $717 billion 15
  • Average Prime LTV: 97.91% 16
  • Average Interest Rate (New Car): 3.77% 17
  • Average Interest Rate (Used Car): 5.29% 18
  • Average Loan Size (New Car): $32,153 19
  • Average Loan Size (Used Car): $20,778 20
  • % Leasing: 37.4% 21

Interest rates for auto loans continue to remain near historic lows. As of the first quarter of 2017, interest rates for used cars was 8.88% on average. The average interest rate on new cars (including leases) is 4.87%. However, the low average rates belie a tightening of auto lending, especially for subprime borrowers.

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Consumer credit information company Experian reports that the average interest rate on all new auto loans was 4.87%, up six basis points from the previous year. 24 The small interest rate increase masks a larger underlying tightening in the auto loan market for new vehicles.

During the last year, lenders tilted away from subprime borrowers. Just 10.88% of new loans went to subprime borrowers compared to 11.41% the previous year. The movement away from subprime borrowers led to a smaller increase in new car interest rates compared to if car rates had stayed the same. 25

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Across all credit scoring segments, borrowers faced higher average borrowing rates. Subprime and deep subprime borrowers saw the largest absolute increases in rate hikes, but super prime borrowers also saw an 18 basis point increase in their borrowing rates over the last year. The average interest rate for super prime borrowers is now 2.84% on average, the highest it’s been since the end of 2011. 27

When comparing credit scores to lending rates, we see a slow tightening in the auto lending market since the end of 2013. The trend is especially pronounced among subprime and deep subprime borrowers. These borrowers face auto loan interest rates growing at rates faster than the market average. Consumers should expect to see the trend toward slightly higher interest rates continue until the economic climate changes.

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Even with the tightening, interest rates remain near historic lows, but that doesn’t mean consumers are paying less interest on their vehicle purchases. The estimated cost of interest on new vehicle purchases is now $4,223, 29 up 42% from its low in the third quarter of 2013.

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Growth in interest paid over the life of the loan stems from longer loans and higher average loan amounts. The average maturity for a new loan grew from 62.5 months in the third quarter of 2008 to 67.4 months in early 2017. 31 During the same time, average loan amounts for new vehicles grew 14.7% to $29,134. 32

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Over the past year, interest rates for used vehicles fell by 35 basis points to 8.88%. The drop in average interest rates came from a dramatic increase of prime borrowers entering the used car financing market. In 2017, 47.4% of used car borrowers had prime or better credit. The year before, 43.99% of used borrowers were prime. 34

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On the whole, borrowers in the used car market face nearly identical rates to this time last year. Super prime and prime borrowers saw upticks of 15 basis points and 4 basis points, respectively. This brought the average super prime borrowing rate up to 3.56% for used vehicles, and the prime rate to 5.29%. 36

On the other end of the spectrum, subprime and deep subprime borrowers saw their interest rates fall by approximately 10 basis points year over year. Despite the decrease, interest rates for these borrowers are up a dramatic 250 basis points (2.5%) from their 2008 rates.

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Although average interest rates on used vehicles continue to fall, the estimated interest paid on a used car loan rose $12 from the previous year to $4,046. The increase in overall interest is part of a larger trend. Over the past four years, estimated interest on used cars was 8.4%. Almost all of the increase comes from longer average loan terms (61 months vs. 57 months), 38 leading to more interest paid over the life of a car loan.

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Auto loan interest rates and credit score

As of March 2017, the median credit score for all auto loan borrowers was 706. 40 A credit score of 706 is just shy of the prime credit rating (720). This is the highest median rate since the first quarter of 2011.

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In the first quarter of 2017, just 31% of all auto loans were issued to subprime borrowers compared with an average of 35% over the past three years.

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Total auto loan volume decreased dramatically between 2008 and 2010. During that time, subprime and deep subprime lending contracted faster than the rest of the market. Since early 2010, auto lending as a whole is near prerecession levels. However, subprime lending has not completely recovered. In the first quarter of 2017, banks issued just $41.5 billion to subprime borrowers. That’s $6.7 billion less than the average $48.2 billion of subprime auto loans issued each quarter between 2005 and 2007.

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Loan-to-value ratios and auto loan interest rates

One factor that influences auto loan interest rates is the initial loan-to-value (LTV) ratio. A ratio over 100% indicates that the driver owes more on the loan than the value of the vehicle. This happens when a car owner rolls “negative equity” into a new car loan.

Among prime borrowers, the average LTV was 97.91%. Among subprime borrowers, the average LTV was 113.40%. 44 Both subprime and prime borrowers show improved LTV ratios from the 2007-2008 time frame. However, LTV ratios increased from 2012 to the present.

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Research from the Experian Market Insights group 46 showed that loan-to-value ratios well over 100% correlated to higher charge-off rates. As a result, car owners with higher LTV ratios can expect higher interest rates. An Automotive Finance Market report from Experian 47 showed that loans for used vehicles with 140% LTV had a 3.03% higher interest rate than loans with a 95%-99% LTV. Loans for new cars charged just a 1.28% premium for high LTV loans.

Auto loan term length and interest rates

On average, auto loans with longer terms result in higher charge-off rates. As a result, financiers charge higher interest rates for longer loans. Despite the higher interest rates, longer loans are becoming increasingly popular in both the new and used auto loan market.

The average length to maturity for new car loans in 2017 is 67.37 months. 48 For used cars, the average is 61.12 months. 49 The increase in average length to maturity is driven primarily by a concentration of borrowers taking out loans requiring 61-72 months of maturity. 50

In the first quarter of 2017, just 7.1% of all new vehicle loans had payoff terms of 48 months or less, and 72.4% of all loans had payoff periods of more than 60 months. 51 Among used car loans, 18.5% of loans had payoff periods less than 48 months, and 58.3% of loans had payoff periods more than 60 months. 52

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Despite a trend toward more prime lending, we’ve seen deterioration in the rates and volume of severe delinquency. In the first quarter of 2017, $8.27 billion in auto loans fell into severe delinquency. 54 This is near an all-time high.

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Overall, 3.82% of all auto loans are severely delinquent. Delinquent loans have been on the rise since 2014, and the overall rate of delinquent loans is well above the prerecession average of 2.3%.

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Between 2007 and 2010, auto delinquency rates rose sharply, which led to a dramatic decline in overall auto lending. So far, the slow increase in auto delinquency between 2014 and the present has not been associated with a collapse in auto lending. In fact, the total outstanding balance is up 33.4% to $1.167 billion since 2014. 57

However, the increase in auto delinquency means lenders may continue to tighten lending to subprime borrowers. Borrowers with subprime credit should make an effort to clean up their credit as much as possible before attempting to take out an auto loan. This is the best way to guarantee lower interest rates on auto loans.