what is good apr for credit card

I call and ask for lower rates, higher limites and reduced membership fees every 6 months and everytime I do, they say ok.

If you are only going to use it a couple of times a year, then you should not worry about the interest rate. Assuming you do not have a credit history (or much of one), being a college student gives you the opportunity to get approved for credit cards that others (those not in school with no credit history) do not have access to.

That depends on your payment history and credit score. If you have good credit like 700 and above you should have a better APR. What you can do is to call the creditor and simply request a better APR. Oftentimes they will lower your APR. Tell them you have creditcard offers with rates way more competitive. For instance 11.99% and you would like them to match it. Just be straightforward with this. It worked for me!! good luck!

Concentrate on paying off your whole CC balance every month, on time every time, and you wil not need to be concerned about APR. This is also the best way to build your credit at lowest cost to you.


Choosing and applying for a credit card

Use the credit card tool to calculate:

  • how long it will take to repay your balance
  • how much you need to repay each month

What is good apr for credit card

About choosing and applying for credit cards

This information tells you what to look out for when choosing a credit card including comparing cards. It tells you what happens when you apply for a credit card and what you can do if your application is refused.

There are hundreds of credit cards available, so shop around to get the one that suits you best.

Start by thinking about what you want to use the credit card for. This could be to buy things on line or on holiday, to pay your bills or to spread the cost of a purchase. However you choose to use your card, the key thing is whether you will be paying off what you owe every month or spreading repayments over a period.

If you can pay the balance off in full and on time each month, you can take advantage of the interest free period. In this case, the interest rate may not be so important but you may want to look at cards with other incentives like cash back. Even if you think you will be able to pay the balance in full each time, it’s worth planning what you’ll do if you can’t.

If you want to use the card for borrowing and you won’t be paying off the balance each month, you will usually have to pay interest. In this case, you may want to choose a card with a lower interest rate. Don’t forget to make sure you can afford a regular repayment.

For more information about how to choose credit, see Getting the best credit deal.

Checklist of what to look out for when choosing a credit card

Here’s a checklist of some things to look at when you choose a credit card:

  • Annual Percentage Rate (APR). This is the cost of borrowing on the card, if you don’t pay the whole balance off each month. You can compare the APR for different cards which will help you to choose the cheapest. You should also compare other things about the cards, for example, fees, charges and incentives
  • minimum repayment. If you don’t pay off the balance each month, you will be asked to repay a minimum amount. This is typically around 3% of the balance due or £5, whichever is higher
  • annual fee. Some cards charge a fee each year for use of the card. The fee is added to the amount due and you will have to pay interest on the fee as well as on your spending, unless you pay it in full
  • charges. Check in the credit agreement what other charges apply to the card. You will usually be charged for going over your credit limit, for using the card abroad and for late payments
  • introductory interest rates. This is where you start off paying a low rate of interest or none at all. The rate then increases after a certain amount of time. For example, it could increase after six months or from a certain date. You’ll often see an introductory rate for balance transfers. If you are comparing cards, look at how long the introductory rate lasts as well as the interest rate it changes to at the end of the introductory period
  • loyalty points or rewards. The points add up depending on the amount you spend and you can then use them to buy goods. Sometimes this is in particular shops. Check how and where the rewards can be used and think about how likely you are to use them
  • cash back. This is where you get money refunded to your card, depending on how much you spend. Check that you are likely to qualify for the cash back. For example, it may only apply if you pay your balance in full each month. A lower interest rate may be a better deal.

When you are given information about a credit card, it should include a summary box with standard key information about the card. This should include the interest free period, interest rate and other charges. This is so that you can easily compare different cards.

You can find more information about the credit card summary box including an explanation of what all the terms mean, on the UK Cards Association's website at: www.theukcardsassociation.org.uk.

You can use a comparison website to see what different credit card providers are offering. This can help you choose the right card for you. There are lots of comparison websites and not all credit cards will be shown on all sites. So you may need to look around for a particular product.

You can find details of some comparison websites in Further help and information.

You can apply for a credit card:

You will have to fill in a form and the credit card provider will check your credit record with a credit reference agency, to see if you are credit worthy.

Your credit record shows information about how you handle your finances, such as your bank account and any other borrowing you have. It tells the provider whether you are a good payer and about any court orders you have had in the last six years. You can check your credit record yourself by contacting one of the credit reference agencies. There is a small fee.

For more information about your credit file and how to contact the credit reference agencies, see Being refused credit in Credit.

When you fill in the application form for a credit card, be careful to make sure all the information you put is correct. If you are not sure about how to complete the form, ask the credit card provider for help. You will have to sign the form to say all the information is correct and any false information you give may be seen as fraud.

If your application is accepted you will be asked to sign a credit agreement. This is a legal document which sets out what you and the provider are agreeing to. The credit agreement includes details such as how much you can borrow, how much and when to repay, the interest rate and charges that can be added, your rights and responsibilities under the agreement and any other conditions that apply to it. Always try to read the small print so you know exactly what you are agreeing to.

You can apply for additional cardholders to have permission to use your card. But remember, if you do this you are responsible for paying off whatever they spend on your card. It’s a good idea to agree some rules with any additional card holders about when they can use the card and make sure they tell you about their spending. Otherwise, you could go over your credit limit or have more to pay off than you expected.

Providers don’t have to give you a credit card. Your application may be refused if your credit score is low or you are not a good risk. Ask the provider to tell you which credit reference agency they used if you want to check your credit file.

For more information about how credit card providers decide whether to give you credit, see Being refused credit in Credit.

Although credit card providers can decide not to give you credit, they are not allowed to discriminate against you when they make their decision. This means they aren't allowed to refuse to give you credit just because of your race, sex, disability, religion, sexuality or where you live.

If you think you were discriminated against when you applied for a credit card, get advice from an adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by e-mail, click nearest CAB.

For more information about how to deal with credit cards, see Credit cards.

You may also find the following Adviceguide information helpful:

The Money Advice Service is a free, independent service. Their website (www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk) has lots of useful information about borrowing and managing your money.

Go to their website for more information about:

You can use a comparison website to see what different credit card providers are offering. Here are some examples of comparison websites:


What is annual percentage rate (APR)?

Shopping around for credit cards can be confusing. You'll need to choose from different features like the APR, interest rates and promotional offers.

Here we've explained how APR works and broken down the jargon around the interest rates, offers and fees you're likely to see.

APR stands for annual percentage rate.

Whenever you borrow money on a credit card, you'll usually find there's an interest rate applied to it. This is typically expressed as an APR. The APR is the yearly cost of borrowing, this is what you'll pay on top of the money you borrow.

When you shop around for a credit card, you'll see each one has an APR. This is usually the representative APR. It's the percentage you'll pay back to your credit provider.

If you select an APR based on the representative rate, it's important to remember that not everyone will receive that rate. At least 51% of successful applicants receive the representative APR and the rest may receive a different rate, which could be higher than this.

When you see a representative example, you're looking at the annual rate of interest you'll have to pay on everyday spending, together with any extra fees such as the annual fee.

It's calculated using an example credit amount of £1,200 and describes the interest rate for a whole year.

This doesn't mean you'll receive the same credit amount or interest rate, but it helps you to compare how much your borrowing might cost you across your different credit options.

Your credit card provider decides on the rate you'll pay by looking at your credit score. Your credit score tells your provider if there's a risk of lending to you in the future.

If you've missed or made a late repayment on a credit account or a mobile phone contract before, it can negatively affect your credit score. This could affect the APR you ultimately receive.

If you're not given the advertised rate, you'll receive a personal APR.

Once you know your APR, you'll roughly be able to work out the cost of borrowing.

On a basic level, borrowing money at an APR of 10% means you'll pay 10% of the amount that you borrow over a year plus the original credit amount.

However, the full amount you end up paying depends on:

  • how much you choose to pay back each month
  • how long it takes you to back that money, and
  • how you use your credit amount while you’re paying it off.

The total amount you pay back may be affected by the repayment method you choose and if you make early or overdue payments. It may also be affected by other rates and fees you'll see listed below.

When you start repaying the money you borrow and the interest each month, there are two main repayment methods – minimum and fixed.

Minimum repayments are usually between 2 and 5% of the borrowed credit on your account. Fixed repayments are a set amount such as £10.

Credit cards allow you to choose your repayment amounts each month, including making minimum repayments.

There are of course a few other options. You can choose to make minimum repayments and pay a fixed amount on top. You can also pay off your balance in full each month.

With repayments, it's important to remember that the smaller the amount you pay back each month, the longer it will take you to pay off your balance. This often means you'll pay more interest too.

Other rates and fees you might see

When you're looking for a credit card, you'll see lots of interest rates and fees. This is because the services you can use with different credit cards often have different interest rates attached. For example, services like balance transfers could carry a different interest rate to purchases.

Here we've explained what these rates and fees mean to you.

To make purchases on your credit card, you'll have to pay a purchase rate.

This is the interest you'll pay on the money that you've borrowed to make purchases (such as petrol or new shoes).

If you don't pay off your credit card in full each month, you'll be charged a purchase rate on the outstanding balance.

A cash advance, or cash withdrawal, is the money you withdraw with your credit card, from an ATM for example.

When you withdraw cash from your credit account you'll have to pay interest on it.

The interest you pay is calculated daily. This means, every day you don't pay off your balance in full you'll have to pay more interest, so it's best to keep withdrawals just for emergencies where possible.

When you withdraw cash from your credit account, you also have to pay a fee for this service. This is usually around 3% of the amount you withdraw.

If you take a cash advance while you're abroad, the ATM might charge you an extra fee. That's on top of the usual cash advance fee, and any interest you pay on cash advances.

You'll also need to pay interest on the fees you receive for using the cash advance service.

A balance transfer rate is the rate of interest you pay on any debt you transfer to your credit card from other credit or store cards.

Some people move their debt to a new card to make it more manageable or to take advantage of a lower interest rate than the one they're paying.

A balance transfer fee is the money you pay for using the balance transfer service.

This is a set percentage of the amount you transfer, usually between 1 and 5%, which is added to your outstanding balance.

Some credit cards don't charge a fee for balance transfers, but this isn't usually the case.

When you compare credit cards, you might see that some have promotional offers. This is usually a period of time where a service you use on your credit card is interest free.

Services such as balance transfers or purchases may have promotional interest-free or low-interest periods.

For example, if you have an interest rate of 0% on balance transfers for 24 months, you won't pay any interest on transferred debts for 24 months.

If you choose an offer that gives you 0% interest on purchases, it means that for a certain period, you won't have to pay a purchase rate on top of the things you buy.

Often, keeping your promotional offer for the full period depends on you paying off your balance in full and on time. If you miss a payment or you're late with a payment, the promotional period could end.

Once the interest free period ends, you'll have to pay the standard interest rate on any remaining balance.

Remember: Interest builds up over time, so it's best to pay back the money you've borrowed in full as soon as you can. The longer you take to pay off the money you've borrowed, the more interest you'll have to pay.


Best Credit Cards From Our Partners

These are some of the most popular credit cards from our partners. We've outlined some key features along with what to like and what to look out for. You can also search all credit cards on Credit Karma for more options.

Featured Cards by Credit Score Updated: 9/1/2017 Advertiser Disclosure

For consumers with limited credit histories, these are some of the most popular credit cards from our credit card partners. If you have a limited credit history, you may have fewer options. One of the cards recommended below could help you start building a positive credit history.

Cards for Poor Credit (549 or Lower)

With poor credit, your options for credit cards are somewhat limited. Most companies won't provide a credit line without a deposit and virtually all credit cards are going to charge monthly fees. However, if used responsibly, these cards may be the best way to start establishing or rebuilding your credit. Below are our favorite cards for poor credit offered by our credit card partners.

Fair credit consumers are on the fence with most credit card issuers. Approvals tend to be based on your credit score and other factors such as income and credit card debt. If approved, most cards come with a small annual fee and a low credit limit. However small the credit limit, this is a great option if you have fair credit and can help you continue to improve your credit score. Below are our favorite cards for fair credit offered by our credit card partners.

With good credit, there are more credit card options available and it's important to comparison shop. You'll discover a wide range of APRs, benefits and fees, so make sure to do your research before applying. Start by checking out our favorite credit cards for good credit offered by our credit card partners.

Cards for Excellent Credit (720 or Higher)

With excellent credit, you can be a bit more selective when it comes to shopping for a credit card. It's important to choose a card based on how you plan to use it in order to save the most money or earn the most rewards. Below are our favorite credit cards for excellent credit offered by our credit card partners.

  • No annual fee, and all the credit building benefits with responsible card use
  • Unlike a prepaid card, it builds credit when used responsibly, with regular reporting to the 3 major credit bureaus
  • You will get an initial $200 credit line after making a security deposit of $49, $99, or $200, determined based on your creditworthiness
  • Get access to a higher credit line after making your first 5 monthly payments on time with no additional deposit needed
  • Easily manage your account 24/7 with online access, by phone, or using our mobile app
  • It’s a credit card accepted at millions of locations worldwide
    • Flexible deposit requirements, depending on your creditworthiness
    • Access a higher credit line after making first 5 monthly payments on time (where eligible)
    • No annual fee
    • No rewards program
    • High APR
    • Requires a security deposit

The Capital One® Secured Mastercard® is a good option for people with little or no credit history who are looking to build their credit.

This Capital One® Secured Mastercard® has no set up or processing fees. Capital One® reports to all three major credit bureaus so you can take steps to build your credit history. While this card does require an initial security deposit, Capital One® may increase your credit limit without any additional deposits if you use your credit responsibly.

Secured credit cards are great for building credit, but they typically come with annual fees and a required security deposit - and without rewards. It’s important to use your credit responsibly in order to build toward a card with more attractive perks.

  • No Annual Fee, and unlike a prepaid card, it helps build credit history with monthly notifications to the credit bureaus
  • A security deposit is required for this product (minimum $200)
  • Pay your bill on time every month to avoid damaging your credit. Citi can help keep you on track with Auto Pay, online Bill Pay and alerts.
  • Use the card anywhere Mastercard® is accepted — worldwide
    • No annual fee
    • Reports to all three credit bureaus
    • No rewards program
    • High APR
    • Security deposit required

The Citi® Secured Mastercard® is a great option for consumers looking for a starter card to help build their credit through responsible use and on-time payments.

The Citi® Secured Mastercard® is available to people with little or no credit, and reports monthly to the major credit bureaus. There are also no application fees associated with this card, though note the required security deposit.

It’s a secured credit card, meaning you’ll have to put down a security deposit equal to the size of your credit limit. There’s also a relatively high APR.

  • No annual fee, and all the credit building benefits with responsible card use
  • Unlike a prepaid card, it builds credit when used responsibly, with regular reporting to the 3 major credit bureaus
  • You will get an initial $200 credit line after making a security deposit of $49, $99, or $200, determined based on your creditworthiness
  • Get access to a higher credit line after making your first 5 monthly payments on time with no additional deposit needed
  • Easily manage your account 24/7 with online access, by phone, or using our mobile app
  • It’s a credit card accepted at millions of locations worldwide
    • Flexible deposit requirements, depending on your creditworthiness
    • Access a higher credit line after making first 5 monthly payments on time (where eligible)
    • No annual fee
    • No rewards program
    • High APR
    • Requires a security deposit

The Capital One® Secured Mastercard® is a good option for people with little or no credit history who are looking to build their credit.

This Capital One® Secured Mastercard® has no set up or processing fees. Capital One® reports to all three major credit bureaus so you can take steps to build your credit history. While this card does require an initial security deposit, Capital One® may increase your credit limit without any additional deposits if you use your credit responsibly.

Secured credit cards are great for building credit, but they typically come with annual fees and a required security deposit - and without rewards. It’s important to use your credit responsibly in order to build toward a card with more attractive perks.

  • Build Your Credit fast with our monthly reporting to all 3 major credit bureaus.
  • Choose your credit line as low as $200 up to $3000, secured by a fully-refundable* security deposit.
  • Security deposit needs to be submitted before the credit card can be issued.
  • No credit check necessary and no checking account required; apply in less than 5 minutes.
  • Extra credit when you need it, increase your credit line up to $5000 at any time*.
  • Access to online financial education.
  • *View our Cardholder Agreement located at the bottom of the application page for details of the card. Click the Apply Now button to get to the application page.
    • No credit check
    • Competitive APR compared to other secured cards
    • Reports to all 3 major credit bureaus
    • No rewards program
    • Annual fee ($35)
    • Requires a security deposit

The OpenSky® Secured Credit Visa® Card is a good choice for people who are looking to build their credit without paying too much in fees.

The OpenSky® Secured Credit Visa® Card reports regularly to all 3 major credit bureaus, making it useful for building credit. The $35 annual fee is relatively low for a card aimed at people with limited credit history, and there are no other processing, servicing or application fees. There’s no credit check for applicants.

There’s a slightly higher penalty APR for cardholders who have missed a payment. This is also a secured credit card, meaning you’ll have to put down a deposit equal to your credit line in order to get access to credit.

Capital One® QuicksilverOne® Cash Rewards Credit Card

Capital One® QuicksilverOne® Cash Rewards Credit Card

  • Earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, every day
  • Use your QuicksilverOne card and get 50% back as a statement credit on your monthly Spotify Premium subscription, now through April 2018
  • No rotating categories or sign-ups needed to earn cash rewards; plus, cash back won't expire for the life of the account and there's no limit to how much you can earn
  • Get access to a higher credit line after making your first 5 monthly payments on time
  • Fraud coverage if your card is ever lost or stolen
  • Use online banking to access your account, even from your smartphone, with our mobile app
  • Help strengthen your credit for the future with responsible card use
    • High rewards rate: 1.5% cash back on all purchases
    • Access to higher credit line after making first 5 monthly payments on time (where eligible)
    • Annual fee ($39)
    • High APR (24.99% variable)

The Capital One® QuicksilverOne® Cash Rewards Credit Card is a great choice for people with fair to good credit who are looking for a credit card with a straightforward cash back rewards program.

Capital One® QuicksilverOne® Cash Rewards offers 1.5% cash back on all purchases.

This card comes with an annual fee, so it’s important to weigh that against the cash back benefits.

  • Pay no annual fee
  • Get access to a higher credit line after making your first 5 monthly payments on time
  • Fraud coverage if your card is lost or stolen
  • Use online banking to access your account, even from your smartphone, with our mobile app
  • Pay by check, online, or at a local branch, all with no fee - and pick the monthly due date that works best for you
  • Get access to your account 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
  • Help strengthen your credit for the future with responsible card use
    • Access to higher credit line after making first 5 monthly payments on time (where eligible)
    • No annual fee
    • No rewards program
    • High APR

The Capital One® Platinum Credit Card is a good choice for people looking to establish or rebuild their credit.

Cardholders pay no annual fee. Credit lines start small, but can increase over time with reliable payments. The Capital One® Platinum Credit Card also offers $0 fraud liability if your card is lost or stolen, and there’s no balance transfer fee.

Like a lot of cards geared toward establishing or building credit, this card has a relatively high interest rate. You could face high interest costs if you don’t pay off your balance in full each month.

The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express

The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express

  • Earn 10,000 Membership Rewards® points after you use your new Card to make $1,000 in purchases in your first 3 months.
  • Terms Apply.
  • Low intro APR: 0% for 12 months on purchases and balance transfers, then a variable rate, currently 13.99% to 23.99%.
  • No annual fee.
  • 2x points at US supermarkets, on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1x); 1x points on other purchases.
  • Use your Card 20 or more times on purchases in a billing period and earn 20% more points on those purchases less returns and credits.
  • Expanding merchant acceptance: Over 1 million more places in the U.S. started accepting American Express® Cards in the last year.
  • Visit our credit card partner’s site in order to learn more and securely apply for The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express
    • 20% more points when you use the card at least 20 times in a billing period
    • 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers for 12 months
    • No annual fee
    • Low base rewards rate
    • Balance transfer fee
    • Limited international acceptance

The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express has plenty of rewards-earning potential.

The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express is a great card for accumulating rewards on everyday purchases. Cardholders can get 2x points at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1x), along with a one-time bonus of 10,000 points after spending $1,000 on eligible purchases in the first three months of membership.

This card has a penalty APR that applies for at least six months after a late payment, so it’s important to stay on-time with your payments.

  • Unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase – it's automatic
  • Earn a $150 Bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening
  • 0% Intro APR for 15 months from account opening on purchases and balance transfers, then a variable APR of 15.99 - 24.74%. Balance transfer fee is 5% of the amount transferred, $5 minimum
  • No minimum to redeem for cash back
  • Cash Back rewards do not expire as long as your account is open
  • No annual fee
    • High rewards rate: 1.5% cash back on all purchases
    • 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months
    • No annual fee
    • No bonus categories
    • High balance transfer fee (5%)

Chase Freedom Unlimited® offers great cash back rewards with no annual fee.

With Chase Freedom Unlimited®, cardholders can earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every single purchase, which is pretty cool. If you spend $500 on purchases in the first 3 months, you can also earn an additional $150 bonus. The rewards never expire as long as your account is open, there’s no annual fee and there’s also a 0% intro APR for 15 months on both purchases and balance transfers.

This card includes a 3% foreign transaction fee. Chase Freedom Unlimited® also doesn’t have 5% cash back in rotating categories, which is a feature of the standard Chase Freedom card.

Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite Mastercard®

Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite Mastercard®

  • Earn 50,000 bonus miles after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 90 days - that's enough to redeem for a $500 travel statement credit
  • Earn 2X miles on all purchases
  • Redeem for travel or cash back statement credits, gift cards and merchandise. Redemption values vary
  • Get 5% miles back to use toward your next redemption, every time you redeem
  • Miles don't expire as long as your account is open, active and in good standing
  • No foreign transaction fees on anything you buy while in another country
  • 0% introductory APR for 12 months on Balance Transfers made within 45 days of account opening. After that, a variable APR will apply, 16.99%, 20.99% or 23.99%, based on your creditworthiness. Please note, there is a fee for balance transfers
    • Solid rewards rate: 2x miles on all purchases
    • Flexible redemption options
    • No foreign transaction fees
    • Annual fee after the first year ($89)
    • High redemption minimum for travel (10,000 miles or $100)

The Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite Mastercard® is great for consumers with excellent credit who want to pile up travel rewards fast.

Cardholders earn 2x miles on all credit card purchases. If you can budget out $3,000 in purchases for your first 90 days, you can earn 50,000 bonus miles too. The Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite Mastercard® also features a 0% introductory APR on balance transfers for 12 months within 45 days of account opening, a waived annual fee in the first year and no foreign transaction fees.

After the first year, cardholders pay an $89 annual fee, so that should be weighed against the benefits of any rewards earned. Cardholders also pay a 3% or $5 (whichever is greater) balance transfer fee.

  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Earn 5,000 bonus points after you add the first authorized user and make a purchase in the first 3 months from account opening
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel
  • No blackout dates or travel restrictions - as long as there's a seat on the flight, you can book it through Chase Ultimate Rewards
    • Killer sign-up bonus worth $625 toward travel redeemed through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
    • 25% more value when redeeming for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
    • No foreign transaction fee
    • Annual fee after the first year ($95)
    • No intro APR

The Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card is a travel rewards card aimed at excellent credit consumers.

Cardholders get 2 points for every dollar spent on travel and restaurants, and 1 point for every other dollar spent on purchases. The Chase Ultimate Rewards program offers a 25% discount on travel purchases made using points. The card also has no foreign transaction fee and offers a 50,000 point bonus if you spend $4,000 in the first 3 months.

After the first year, there’s a $95 annual fee. There’s no intro APR for purchases or balance transfers.

* See the online provider's credit card application for details about terms and conditions. Reasonable efforts are made to maintain accurate information. However, all credit card information is presented without warranty. When you click on the "Apply Now" button, you can review the credit card terms and conditions on the provider's website.

† Credit Karma looks at how your credit profile compares to other Credit Karma members who were approved for this product. Of course, there's no such thing as a sure thing, but knowing whether your Approval Odds are Very Good, Good, Fair or Poor may help you narrow down your choices.

‡ Average score refers to the arithmetic mean and typical low score to the 5th percentile of, in each case, available VantageScore 3.0 credit scores provided by TransUnion of Credit Karma members who were approved for this product from March 2017 through August 2017. Average and typical approved scores are provided as guidelines only and approval is not guaranteed. You can learn more about credit card approval through our in-depth article.

Advertiser Disclosure: The offers that appear on this site are from third party advertisers from which Credit Karma receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). It is this compensation that enables Credit Karma to provide you with services like free access to your credit scores and free monitoring of your credit and financial accounts at no charge. Credit Karma strives to provide a wide array of offers for our members, but our offers do not represent all financial services companies or products.