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Best Buy Credit Card Payment and Login

Making your Best Buy credit card payment or need to login to manage your account online? Best Buy is a large international retailer of consumer electronics, with the majority of stores in the US. Being one of the biggest electronic retail giants and having won company of the year awards, many consumers trust Best Buy to deliver quality at affordable prices. With a Best Buy Reward Zone Credit Card however, even more savings can be made, alongside extra bonuses and rewards. This article covers this credit card, including interest rates and terms, and a guide to making payments. To make a payment online or manage your account, simply follow the Pay Online link provided below on this page to the Best Buy credit card login.

The Best Buy credit card is issued by Capital One. There are a variety of ways to pay your credit balance each month.

Pay Online: With an online account you can make payments, as well as view your transaction history, see your due dates and do many more management activities. To make your Best Buy credit card payment online click the “Pay Online” button below to login or register.

Pay by Phone: The Best Buy credit card payment phone number is 1-800-365-0292 (you will need your account number and a bank check).

Pay by Mail: Postal payments can be made to Capital One, and the address to send to is printed on your statement. Please include your Best Buy account number on your check. Your account number is located on your statement. To ensure your Best Buy payment is received on time it is recommended that you mail your payment at least 5 business days prior to the due date shown on your monthly billing statement.

Pay in Store: Yes. You can pay the balance by check or cash at any of the Best Buy stores nationwide, and to find you nearest store please follow this link.

Best Buy Credit Card Customer Service: The Best Buy credit card 800 number for credit related customer service is 1-800-365-0292.

The Capital One Best Buy Reward Zone credit card offers you two main promotional choices for when you make Best Buy purchases. You can either select the smart financing option, which gives you 1 point per $1 spent on qualifying purchases and special low-interest financing promotions, or you can select the rewards options, which gives you 2 points per $1 spent on every Best Buy purchase (promotional financing not included).

Financing options on different product ranges and for different price ranges include 6 months for purchase above $149, 18 months above $429 and 3 years for above $899. These options can be selected whenever you make a purchase, and this gives you the freedom to select the most beneficial option as and when.

With Reward Zone you can receive a $5 coupon to spend in-store for every 250 points earned. Points will be credited to your account within 35 days of the purchase. A full description of Best Buy’s Reward program can be found on their website. Best Buy also offers exclusive offers and events for cardholders, which you can find out more about when you sign up for the credit card.

Best Buy Credit Card Interest Rates and Terms

The annual percentage rate for purchases will vary between 25.24% and 27.99% variable depending on your application. The grace period for no paying interest on your balance is 25 days after the previous day (if you pay the balance in full). The minimum interest charge is $2. Late payment and return payment fee $35. Rates of interest will vary depending on the Prime Rate.

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Best buy was founded in 1966 by Richard Schultz. The store was original called Sound of Music until 1983 when the name was changed to Best Buy. With more than 1,400 stores and locations it is now the world’s largest consumer electronic store. The store has more than 140,000 employees and operates in United States, Canada, China and Mexico. According to the company, more than 70 percent of Americans are within 15 minutes of a Best Buy store. Best Buy offers electronics, audio/video equipment, appliances, computers, computer software and many other products.


The 10 best credit cards to fit any lifestyle

Who owns best buy credit cardsThere's a credit card out there for everyone. Flickr / Quique

Choosing the right credit card can be a stressful process. With an overwhelming amount of choices out there, it's difficult to know which best suits your needs.

Personal finance and credit card comparison site NerdWallet selected the best credit cards out there for everyone — from college students to jetsetters to those with less-than-ideal credit.

Scroll down to see their top picks.

If you're still having a hard time choosing after checking out the roundup, try NerdWallet's tool to help you find the perfect credit card for your lifestyle.

Best for people who don't want to pay an annual fee: Citi Double Cash Card

Who owns best buy credit cards

Purchase APR: 0% APR for 15 months. After that, variable rate from 12.99% to 22.99%.

Why it's best: Earn unlimited 1% cash back on all your purchases, and an additional 1% cash back when you pay them off. You choose whether your cash back comes as statement credit, a gift card, or a check.

Best for everyday use: Blue Cash Preferred Card from American Express

Who owns best buy credit cards

Purchase APR: 0% intro APR for 15 months. After that, variable rate from 12.99% to 21.99%.

WhyВ it's best: You can earn 6% cash back on groceries (up to $6,000 spent annually) and 3% back at gas stations. Earn 3% cash back at select department stores and 1% on everything else.

Best for travelers: Barclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard

Who owns best buy credit cards

Annual fee:В First year is free, then $89 per year.

Purchase APR:В 0% APR for 12 months.В After that, variable rate from 15.99% to 19.99%.

Why it's best:В Earn two miles on every $1 that you spend, withВ no limit to how many miles you can earn.В No foreign transaction fee; the sign-up bonus will earn youВ 40,000В miles when you spend $3,000 or more on purchases in yourВ first 90 days as an account holder.В

Best for frequent fliers and foodies: Chase Sapphire Preferred Card

Who owns best buy credit cards

Annual fee: First year is free, then $95 per year.

Purchase APR: 15.99% ( APR will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate).

Why it's best:В Earn two rewards points per $1 spent on travel and restaurants, and one point per $1 spent anywhere else. You canВ transfer your points to a participating frequent flier programs at a 1:1 rate (1,000 rewards points would mean 1,000 partner miles/points).В No foreign transaction fee; earn earn 40,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in your first three months . В

Best for people who book hotels often: Starwood Preferred Guest Credit Card from American Express

Who owns best buy credit cards

Annual fee:В First year is free, then $95 per year.

Purchase APR:В Variable rate from 15.24% to 19.24%.

Why it's best:В You can earn fiveВ Starpoints for every dollar you spend at a Starwood Preferred Guest hotel, and one Starpoint for every other dollar spent elsewhere.В You can then use Starpoints to redeem free nights at over 1,100 hotels and resorts and free flights on over 150 airlines. GetВ aВ sign-up bonus of 30 ,000 Starpoints after you make $3,000 in purchases within the first three months.

Best for people with average credit: Barclaycard Rewards MasterCard

Who owns best buy credit cards

Purchase APR:В 24.99% ( APR will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate).

Why it's best:В While this card doesn't offer a sign-up bonus or intro APR promotions, you can qualify with an average credit score. Also, you will be alerted if your credit score changes, and your account will be reviewed and considered for a credit line increase after five consecutive on-time payments.В Earn 2% cash back per $1 on gas, groceries and utilities, and 1% back elsewhere.

Best for people short on cash or with low credit: Capital One Secured MasterCard

Who owns best buy credit cards

Purchase APR:В 24.9% ( APR will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate).

Why it's best: If you don’t have great credit, but want to start building it up, this no-annual-fee card is a great option. It requires a security deposit, but you don't have to make your collateral deposit right away (just within 80 days of opening the account). You'll have access to Capital One's Credit Tracker tool with this card, which lets you track credit score improvement.

Best for people with a small business: Ink Plus Business Credit Card

Who owns best buy credit cards

Annual fee: First year is free, then $95 per year.

Purchase APR: 15.24%В ( APR will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate).

Why it's best: You will earn five rewards points per $1 spent on office supplies, cable, and telecom services (up to $50,000 each year), and two points per $1 spent on gas and hotels. Rewards points can beВ transferred to participating frequent flier programs at a 1:1 rate (partners include Southwest, Marriott, and Hyatt).В No foreign transaction fee; sign-up bonus of 50,000 bonus points after you spend $5,000 on purchases in your first three months.

Best for college students: Citi ThankYou Preferred Card

Who owns best buy credit cards

Purchase APR: 0% APR for 7 months. After that, variable rate from 13.99% to 23.99%.

Why it's best: You can earn two "ThankYou points" per dollar spent on dining and entertainment and one ThankYou point per dollar spent on all other purchases.В ThankYou points can be redeemed for gift cards from retailers, transferred to Amazon's points program and frequent flier programs, or can be used to buy tickets from LiveNation.com.В A sign-up bonus will earn you 2,500 bonus ThankYou points after spending $500 within your first three months.

Best for people who want store credit: Discover it-Double Cash Back Card

Who owns best buy credit cards

Purchase APR:В 0% APR for 6 months.В After that, APR will be a variable rate from 10.99% to 22.99%.

Why it's best:В EarnВ 5% cash back in categories that change each quarter (up to $1,500 per quarter), and 1% back on everything else. The categories are broad and include restaurants, gas, and online shopping. This card also will give you purchase protection and warranty extension.


who owns best buy credit cards

Inside information from a reformed credit card thief shows how crooks get their information by harvesting email addresses and buying stolen numbers to use on forged cards.

He told the online credit card news and information site CreditCards.com how he did it and provides useful information on what he himself now does to safeguard his own cards.

Fortunately for him (and us!), he got caught, changed sides to help the Secret Service, repaid his victims and, as this week’s report demonstrates, agreed to help others avoid falling victim to the crime.

But first, we urge you to take a look at these top articles from our other websites:

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Top 5 Myths about Aging: You are only as old as you think you are as these myths about aging will demonstrate!

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Home Remedies for Back Acne – Easy and Inexpensive: Here are three winning combinations for getting rid of back acne, just in time for warm weather.

And now for the main feature…

Credit Card Security Tips — from a Credit Card Thief!

A former credit card thief has confessed online that the crime, which rakes in more than $500m a year in the US, is “ridiculously easy” to commit.

Using stolen numbers that cost $10 to $50 apiece, Dan DeFelippi manufactured genuine-looking credit cards from blanks, programming their magnetic stripes, and used them to buy hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of merchandise at stores, which he then sold online.

He was part of a loose network of crooks who, according to recent research by leading ID theft surveyors Javelin Strategy, account for around 4.5 million credit card fraud victims in the US alone every year.

Since being convicted in 2004, the ex-credit card thief has spilled the beans on the murky world of credit card fraud, even working with the US Secret Service to train agents and expose the workings of online hackers and fraudsters.

Now a website developer in New York, he recently told his story to the online credit card comparison and news site CreditCards.com.

Starting out as a teenage hacker, DeFelippi progressed to selling bogus IDs at college, realizing how easy it was to discover individuals’ personal and confidential information.

He used software that harvested email addresses from specific age groups and locales, then bombarded them with messages pretending to be from the likes of AOL and PayPal, saying their credit card details had expired.

Inevitably, these phishing messages contained a link to a bogus page asking victims to re-enter their details.

“It’s kind of scary how much information I could get,” DeFelippi tells CreditCards.com.

But he admits it’s more difficult these days for a credit card thief to get information this way because many card users have wised up to this spoof.

It was simpler and quicker to buy credit card numbers from crooks who hack computers, set up bogus online stores selling non-existent goods at bargain prices, “skim” the numbers from ATMs, or simply steal them at restaurants or from documents.

We covered the “art” of skimming in a recent Scambusters report, Gas Pumps Targeted in Latest Card Skimming Scam.

To give some idea of the scale of this crime, in March this year a British teenager was sentenced to five years behind bars after being convicted of setting up an online forum that bought and sold hundreds of thousands of credit card numbers.

The site even offered software and tutorials on how to steal and use the information.

Armed with such numbers, DeFelippi says, it was a cinch for him to produce cards. Anyone with $100 and a computer could do it, he claims.

So, what’s his advice to the rest of us to help cut the risk of becoming victim of a credit card thief?

Well, here at Scambusters we’re previously provided some useful tips that are worth checking out again.

DeFelippi thinks the most important credit card security action is to frequently check your online accounts.

Once a month just isn’t enough because, if your number was stolen early in the billing cycle, the account could be maxed out before you even look at it.

If you have teens-and-twenties in your household, make particularly certain they do the same. According to the Javelin research mentioned earlier, this is the age group least likely to check their online accounts.

The former credit card thief says he now uses the free services of Mint.com, which is owned by the financial software company Intuit (producers of TurboTax, Quicken and QuickBooks), to monitor his accounts for credit card fraud every day.

The Mint site pulls together all your online financial information into a single location, making it easier to review and spot signs of credit card theft.

If you visit the site, you’ll see that Mint, which claims to have 5 million users, stresses it can’t be used for transactions, only monitoring, and that it uses bank-level data security to protect your information.

We have no information, one way or the other, on the reliability of this site.

DeFelippi also advises:

  • Checking your credit report at least a couple of times a year to make sure you’re not a victim of ID theft. You can do this for free, once a year, for each of the three credit reporting agencies. See this Scambusters issue, Can You Really Get a Free Credit Report — Without Getting Scammed? for the scam-proof and free way of doing this.
  • Do your online shopping with reputable established sites. Otherwise, thoroughly check out companies you don’t know or haven’t dealt with, looking for others’ comments on their experiences.In particular, don’t be tempted to buy merchandise from an email that came from a person or company you don’t know, no matter how much of a bargain it seems.
  • Double check that any page on which you’re about to give your card details is secure — that it has “https” at the start of the address (the “s” is the security indicator).Remember that when you’re online, you’re moving data backwards and forwards. If you’re using an open wireless network, assume it’s not secure and that you could be vulnerable to credit card fraud.
  • Invent your own answers to the security questions many financial sites now use. Don’t use the real information. That way, nobody will be able to guess or research it.(Of course, you’ll have to make sure you can remember the answers you gave!)
  • Use the same ATM for all your cash withdrawals. You’ll get to know the machine and therefore more likely will spot if anyone has tampered with it.Bank locations are less likely to be vulnerable than convenience stores or clubs, he suggests.

Like us, you might be wondering how DeFelippi got caught. It happened at a Best Buy store he visited with a friend. The accomplice presented a phony driver’s license, bearing his real photo, as proof of ID.

When the store manager swiped the bogus credit card, he got a “Call For Authorization” message back from the card company, which had become concerned about activity on the account.

Realizing something was wrong, the pair made a hasty retreat — leaving the license with its incriminating photo behind.

It’s probably the best thing that could have happened to DeFelippi. Realizing the error of his ways, he struck a plea deal to pay $200,000 restitution to his victims and to do community service, instead of going to jail.

He’s also done us all a big favor by agreeing to tell his story. For once, we might say, it’s good to encounter a credit card thief!

That’s all we have for today, but we’ll be back next week with another issue. See you then!


Credit card declined? Eight possible reasons.

Understanding why your credit card was declined is the first step in preventing it from happening again. Lack of funds, international purchases, or simply an expired card could be to blame.

By Caroline Thompson , Brad's Deals May 11, 2015

  • Who owns best buy credit cards

Who owns best buy credit cards

The English language has seven words, which, when spoken together, will nearly always ruin the day of the person on the receiving end of them. That fateful sentence? "I'm sorry, your card has been declined."

It can happen without warning. Maybe you're at Starbucks, ready to enjoy your morning coffee, or at Best Buy, about to buy the perfect Christmas present for your husband. No matter the situation, when the clerk hands you back your credit card with a shaking head and an apologetic smile, that sinking feeling in your stomach is universal.

Understanding why your card was declined is the first step in preventing it from happening again. I polled the finance experts here at Brad's Deals, and came up with a list of the eight most common reasons why a credit card would be declined:

1. You lack the funds or you've reached your credit limit.

The most simple explanation for a declined credit card is a lack of funds. Most credit card companies will not allow you to make purchases that will push you over your credit limit, so if you haven't been paying close attention to your credit card statements, or haven't made a significant payment in a while, that cap can come up quicker than expected.

This is a problem for debit card users as well, especially if you have overdraft protection enabled on your checking account. While having your debit card declined might be better than overdrawing your account and having to pay the steep overdraft fees charged by your bank, it's still an embarrassing inconvenience.

Avoiding being declined for this reason should be easy enough: just keep better track of your finances. Paying off your credit card in full every month can help you build credit while at the same time stopping any surprise card declines in their tracks. If you can't do that, make a habit of checking your credit card statement or bank balance online before you buy anything. If you don't have the money, you can't make the purchase--it's as simple as that.

Even if you haven't yet reached your credit limit, if you've missed some payments on your card, your credit card company could put a delinquent stamp on your account and prevent you from spending any more until you pay up. If you have really good credit, the card issuer might give you some slack and let you miss multiple payments before they cut you off, but if your credit report is marred with delinquencies, they'll probably put a stop to it after just one or two missed payments.

Having a delinquent account can really do a number on your credit, so if your card is declined for this reason, fixing the problem should be a priority. Pay off your delinquent balance ASAP or face serious credit problems in the future.

Make sure you call your credit card company before you take a big trip!

To prevent you from being a victim of identity theft, most banks and credit card companies monitor your spending patterns and locations to ensure that you are the one using your card. If they see purchases being made that don't fit the bill, they might freeze your account. While this is helpful if someone steals your wallet in Minneapolis and then tries to spend $500 the next day at a Target in Chicago, it can be a hassle when traveling or making large, out-of-character purchases.

So if you live in Boston but plan on vacationing in California, call your bank or credit card company before you get on the plane. They'll make a note of the fact that you're going out of state, and green light all the purchases you make while you're there (within your credit limit, of course). Same goes for big buys, like a TV, a down payment on a car, etc. If you're planning on buying something expensive that's not something you'd typically purchase, let your credit card company and bank know beforehand just in case. They might not freeze your account in all cases anyway, but it's better to be safe than to have your card declined while trying to buy something you really want or need.

4. You're making an international purchase.

Making online purchases from a foreign company is another way to set off your bank or credit card company's fraud alarm. While it might be tedious, giving your credit card company a heads up before you make a foreign transaction is probably your best bet. And always make sure to vet overseas websites to make sure they're legit before buying anything from them--online shopping can be a veritable landmine of identity theft just waiting to happen, so make sure you know what you're getting into before giving out your credit card number.

5. There's an authorization hold on your account.

A lot of businesses, like rental car companies and hotels, will put holds on your account when you make your reservation, which can sometimes be as much as a few hundred dollars. While you'll get that money back (when you return the car dent-free or check out without having damaged your hotel room beyond repair), if you're close to your credit limit when you make the reservation, the authorization hold could push you over the top, and cause your credit card to be declined.

It's a good idea to make sure you've got ample credit available before making a purchase or reservation with a company that will put a hold on your account, and you should always ask and make a note of how much the hold will be, and how long it will last so you don't end up getting a surprise decline.

When you first get a credit card, the expiration date can seem like a long time in the future. Most cards typically expire two to three years from the day they were issued, but if you're not keeping track, those expiration dates can really sneak up on you. If you try to use a card that's expired, it's going to get declined. Some credit card companies stay on top of this stuff and send you a new card in the mail before your old one expires, but others expect you to update your account yourself.

To avoid having your card declined because it's expired, make sure you're up to date on the expiration dates of all your credit and debit cards. If they're almost up, call up your card issuer and ask for a new one. Simple as that.

7. You made a typo on an online form.

I tried to order lunch online yesterday and my debit card was declined. I was worried for a minute, but then remembered I had recently moved and updated my address on my card's account. When filling in the online form, I'd put in my old zip code out of habit, not the new one that was actually attached to my account. This is an easy mistake to make, even if you haven't recently changed your address. Careless typos or even extra spaces left in the address box can cause your card to be declined, so next time you shop online, make sure to double check that all your info is correct before you press the "order" button.

8. Your bank or credit card company is having technical issues.

Sadly, banks and credit card companies occasionally experience technical issues that interrupt their customers' card service in a certain area, or even across the world. When this happens, there's really nothing you can do but wait it out. Most banks and card issuers take this problem very seriously, and will fix it quickly, but in the meantime you won't be able to make purchases with the affected cards. The best way to be prepared for situations like this (and every other one on this list, too) is to bring backup--be it cash, another card, or a checkbook--you should always have a few different ways to pay on you so you don't get stuck in a sticky situation.

Has your credit card ever been declined? How did you handle it?

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best personal finance bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.


24 Best Travel Rewards Credit Cards – Reviews & Comparison

Who owns best buy credit cards

Travel rewards credit cards fall into several broad categories. First, airline rewards credit cards are designed to reward spending with specific airlines or airline partnerships. When purchasing airfare, in-flight incidentals, and possibly other travel-related items, cardholders earn points at accelerated rates. Once enough points are racked up, they can be redeemed for free or discounted flights, free or reduced baggage fees, and other goodies. Some airline rewards cards offer additional perks and benefits, such as airport lounge access, discounts with hotel partners, and bonus miles for reaching certain travel milestones.

Hotel credit cards focus their rewards firepower on hotel stays and related expenses. Many major hotel brands and brand families offer at least a handful of credit cards that reward cardholders for room, food, and incidental purchases (such as spa treatments) at properties they own. Many hotel rewards credit cards also accumulate points for everyday outlays, such as regular restaurant meals, gasoline, and supermarket purchases. Cardholders can redeem their points for free or discounted nights and other hotel expenses.

Lately, growing numbers of cash back credit cards have jumped into the travel rewards game. General-purpose cards often offer accelerated cash back earnings on gasoline, airfare, and restaurant purchases – all critical, and sometimes costly, expenses for frequent travelers. Cash back rewards can be redeemed for merchandise and gift cards purchased online, airfare and hotel stays purchased directly through providers, and actual cash or statement credits.

If you’re a frequent traveler, you likely stand to benefit from all of these card types. And if you own your own business, you can count on many consumer travel credit cards having small business credit card counterparts – often with additional features and benefits for small business owners. Whether you’re an individual or business customer, many come with attractive promotions and sign-up bonuses that can be hard for deal-seeking applicants to resist.

Here’s a look at today’s best travel rewards credit cards:

Best Travel Rewards Credit Cards (No Annual Fee)

Unlimited 1.5 Miles per $1 Spent on All Purchases; Double Miles in Your First Year as a Cardmember

It’s hard to get simpler than Discover it Miles. For every dollar you spend, you earn 1.5 miles, with no limits, purchase categories, or other restrictions.

Miles are eligible for redemption in any amount as statement credits for travel purchases charged to your Discover it Miles card. Travel purchases include airfare bought directly from the airline (or from an online platform, such as Kayak), hotel stays (again, direct or through an online platform), travel agent commissions, rental car purchases, train fare, and commuter transportation, including short-haul rail and bus tickets.

Discover it Miles comes with a nifty first-year bonus: All miles earned in the first 12 months are automatically doubled, with no limits or restrictions. Notably, this card has no foreign transaction fees.

  • Sign-up Bonus. There’s no sign-up bonus, although Discover’s double first-year miles deal is nice.
  • Key Fees. There’s no foreign transaction fee or annual fee. Balance transfers run 3% of the transferred amount. Cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 5%, while late and returned payments cost $35.
  • Introductory APR. There is a 0% purchase APR and 10.99% balance transfer APR for 12 months.
  • Other Perks. You’re entitled to free WiFi on any flight, payable as a statement credit. You also get a free FICO score every month with your statement.

See our Discover it Miles Card Review for more information. Find out how you can apply for this card here.

2. Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card

1.25 Miles for Every $1 Spent; Redeem for Virtually Any Travel Purchase (Including Flights) or Cash Back Equivalents

Capital One VentureOne Rewards is a somewhat less potent version of Capital One Venture Rewards, but with significant perks: It’s a bit easier to qualify for, there’s no annual fee, and you get a 0% introductory APR on purchases for 12 months. Rewards-wise, you earn an unlimited 1.25 miles for every $1 spent on everything, every day. Miles are always worth $0.01 upon redemption.

As with the Venture Rewards Card, VentureOne lets you redeem points for statement credits on just about any travel purchase, as well as cash equivalents such as statement credits and paper checks. Redemptions start at $25.

One big perk of the VentureOne Rewards card is a nice sign-up bonus that actually outdoes the Venture Rewards Card’s, pound for pound: When you spend at least $1,000 within 3 months, you get 20,000 bonus miles.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 20,000 bonus miles, worth $200, when you spend $1,000 in the first 3 months of card membership.
  • Key Fees. Fees are minimal: no annual, foreign transaction, or balance transfer assessments. Late payments cost $35, while cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 3%.
  • Introductory APR. Enjoy a 0% purchase APR for 12 months.
  • Other Perks. You get a free monthly FICO score and useful financial simulation, credit-building, and planning tools from Capital One Credit Tracker.

3. BankAmericard Travel Rewards® Credit Card

1.5 Points per $1 Spent on Every Purchase; Nice Sign-up Bonus

BankAmericard Travel Rewards is another simple, straight-shooting travel rewards card. This one also earns you an unlimited 1.5 points per $1 spent on everything, every day. However, there is a redemption minimum: $25, regardless of how you redeem. Redemptions come as statement credits for virtually any travel-related purchase, including gas station purchases, baggage fees, car rentals, and airfare, as well as gift cards and general merchandise. Points are worth $0.01 apiece upon redemption.

If you’re a fan of sign-up bonuses, you’re going to love the BankAmericard Travel Rewards Credit Card: When you spend at least $1,000 in 90 days, you get 20,000 bonus points. Watch out for a rather high APR, but enjoy the lack of foreign transaction fees. Also, when you open a Bank of America deposit account, you automatically get a 10% annual points boost: If you earn 10,000 in a 12-billing-cycle period, you end that period with 11,000.

  • Sign-up Bonus. You get 20,000 bonus points, worth up to $200 when redeemed for travel purchases, for spending at least $1,000 within 90 days of opening your account.
  • Key Fees. There are no foreign transaction fees or annual fees. Balance transfers cost the greater of $10 or 3%, while cash advances run the greater of $10 or 5%. Late and returned payments cost $37 and $27, respectively.
  • Introductory APR. There is a 0% APR on purchases for 12 billing cycles.
  • Other Perks. Bank of America Preferred customers earn anywhere from 25% to 75% extra points per year, but minimum balance requirements of $25,000 to as much as $100,000 apply. If you can’t swing those minimums, open a Bank of America deposit account to earn an annual 10% point bonus.

Unlimited 3 Expedia+ Bonus Points per $1 Spent on Travel Purchases Through Expedia; 1 Point per $1 Spent on Everything Else

Expedia+ Card from Citi is a truly all-purpose travel rewards card. All travel-related purchases made through Expedia earn you an unlimited 3 Expedia+ points per $1 spent. Eligible travel purchases include hotels, airfare, vacation packages, car rentals, and more.

Redeem your accumulated points for airline tickets, hotel vouchers, and vacation packages purchased through Expedia. Depending on how you redeem, your redemption minimums are likely to vary – hotel redemptions start at 3,500 points, and flights are somewhat higher. Points are generally worth $0.01 apiece.

The Expedia+ Card has an above-average sign-up bonus: If you make at least $1,000 in total purchases within 3 months, you get 15,000 bonus Expedia+ points. Also, you automatically earn Expedia Silver Status, which confers a 10% points earning bonus, for as long as your account is open and in good standing.

  • Sign-up Bonus. You earn 15,000 Expedia+ rewards bonus points (worth up to $150) when you make $1,000 in total purchases within 3 months.
  • Key Fees. Foreign transactions cost 3% of the total transaction amount, but there’s no annual fee. Balance transfers and cash advances both cost the greater of $5 or 3%. Late and returned payments cost $35.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. Expedia Silver Status bumps your total points earnings by a 10% point bonus at no additional charge. You also get access to VIP amenities – such as spa credits and free parking – at 1,100 participating hotels worldwide.

See our Expedia+ Card Review for more information.

5. Citi® Hilton Honors™ Visa Signature® Card

6 Hilton Honors Points per $1 Spent at Hotels; 3 Points per $1 Spent at Supermarkets, Drugstores & Gas Stations

The Citi Hilton Honors Visa Signature Card earns 6 Hilton Honors bonus points per $1 spent on Hilton portfolio hotel stays; 3 points per $1 spent at gas stations, drugstores, and supermarkets; and 2 points per $1 spent on everything else.

As with the Citi Hilton Honors Reserve Card, you can redeem points for hotel stays and incidental expenses at variable rates and minimums starting at a minimum of 5,000 points. Point values vary by property, but are generally worth less than $0.01. For instance, a $150-per-night room in New York City ranges from 30,000 to 60,000 points. As long as you remain in good standing, you enjoy Hilton Honors Silver Status, which entitles you to a free night on stays of 5 days or longer and automatically boosts your total point earnings by 15%.

This card comes with an attainable sign-up bonus of 75,000 points when you charge at least $2,000 in 3 months. However, the 3% foreign transaction fee is a big drawback for overseas travelers.

  • Sign-up Bonus. When you make at least $2,000 in purchases within 3 months of account opening, you earn 75,000 bonus points, worth up to $750.
  • Key Fees. There’s no annual fee, but foreign transactions cost 3% of the total transaction amount. Cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 5%, and balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 3%. Late and returned payments cost $35 each.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. You can upgrade to Gold Status, which comes with a points boost of 25%, when you stay 4 times within 90 days of account opening or spend $20,000 in your first year. The card also comes with Citi’s Private Pass benefits, including VIP treatment and special access at popular events.

Best Travel Rewards Credit Cards (With Annual Fee)

2 Points per $1 Spent on Dining & Travel; One-to-One Transfer to Participating Frequent Flyer & Hotel Guest Programs

The information related to the Chase Sapphire Preferred credit card has been collected by Money Crashers and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card.

Chase Sapphire Preferred earns an unlimited 2 Ultimate Rewards points per $1 spent on dining and travel, plus 1 point per $1 on all other purchases. Plus, you’re allowed to transfer points at a one-to-one ratio to such participating frequent traveler programs as Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards and IHG Club Rewards – 1,000 Ultimate Rewards points become 1,000 Rapid Rewards points, and so forth. In other words, this is truly an all-purpose travel rewards card.

Ultimate Rewards points are worth up to $0.0125 apiece when redeemed for travel purchases through the Ultimate Rewards portal. They’re worth $0.01 when redeemed for non-travel purchases and cash equivalents, such as gift cards, statement credits, direct deposits, checks, and physical merchandise. The redemption minimum is always 2,000 points.

Look out for the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card’s awesome solid sign-up bonus: When you spend at least $4,000 in 3 months, you get 50,000 bonus Ultimate Rewards points. However, there’s a $95 annual fee, which is waived for one year.

  • Sign-up Bonus. You get 50,000 bonus points, which can be worth as much as $625 when used to purchase airfare and hotels through Ultimate Rewards, when you spend at least $4,000 within 3 months. You also get 5,000 bonus points simply for making one purchase and adding an authorized user in the same 3-month period.
  • Key Fees. The annual fee is $95, waived for the first year. There’s no foreign transaction fee. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 5%, and cash advances cost the greater of 5% or $10.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. You get VIP treatment and exclusive deals for select entertainment and sporting events, including the PGA Championship.

7. Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card

2 Miles for Every $1 Spent; Redeem for Virtually Any Travel Purchases (Including Flights) or Cash Back Equivalents

Capital One Venture Rewards earns you 2 miles for every $1 you spend, no matter how much you spend or where you shop. Miles are worth $0.01 at all times.

Like Discover it Miles and BankAmericard Travel Rewards, the Venture Rewards card allows you to redeem points for statement credits on a wide range of travel purchases, including flights, rental cars, hotels, vacation packages, cruises, and incidental expenses. You can also redeem for general statement credits or paper checks, though redeeming for travel rewards can boost the value of your points beyond the standard $0.01. Redemption minimums start at $25.

This card has a competitive sign-up bonus. When you spend at least $3,000 in the first 90 days of card membership, you earn 40,000 bonus miles. Just be aware that there is a $59 annual fee.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 40,000 bonus miles, worth $400, when you spend at least $3,000 within 3 months of account opening.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $59 annual fee, though it’s waived for the first year. There’s no balance transfer fee or foreign transaction fee. Late payments cost $35, and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 3%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. Capital One offers free and unlimited FICO score access, as well as a host of useful credit-building tools through Capital One Credit Tracker.

See our Capital One Venture Rewards Card Review for more information. Find out how you can apply for this card here.

8. Starwood Preferred Guest® Credit Card from American Express

2 Starpoints per $1 Spent at Starwood (Including Sheraton, Westin, and W) and Marriott properties; 20% Airline Points Transfer Bonus

For every $1 spend at participating Starwood and Marriott hotel properties, the Starwood Preferred Guest Credit Card from American Express earns you 2 Starpoints. All other purchases earn 1 point per $1 spent. Note the $99 annual fee.

Starpoints can be redeemed for free nights at Starwood hotels at variable per-point values – up to $0.025, in some cases. You’re also allowed to transfer Starpoints to any of 30 participating frequent flyer programs (150 airlines in all). When you transfer 20,000 or more points, you get a 5,000 Starpoint bonus. Redemption minimums vary based on the hotel class you book, but start at 2,000 points for the lowest class.

Another big perk of the Starwood Preferred Guest Card is a solid sign-up bonus: 25,000 bonus Starpoints for at least $3,000 in purchases within 3 months of account opening. Free global WiFi access and lack of foreign transaction fees are nice perks as well.

If you’re a business owner, check out this card’s business credit card version: the American Express Starwood Preferred Guest Business Credit Card. It’s very similar to this one, although the business card has a higher sign-up bonus spending threshold ($5,000 versus $3,000).

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 25,000 bonus Starpoints (worth up to $625) for spending at least $3,000 ($5,000 for the business card) within the first 3 months.
  • Key Fees. The annual fee is $95, waived during the first year, but there are no foreign transaction fees. Late and returned payments cost $37, while balance transfers and cash advances both cost the greater of $5 or 3%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no introductory APR.
  • Other Perks. This card comes with a host of fringe benefits, including Return Protection (which pays up to $300 per item and $1,200 per calendar year for rejected merchandise returns) and free WiFi at thousands of hotels and Boingo hotspots.

9. Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite MasterCard®

2 Miles per $1 Spent on All Purchases

Barclaycard Arrival Plus is another great airline rewards card that also happens to be useful for everyday purchases. Every dollar spent earns you 2 miles, with no spending caps or restrictions. Miles are always worth $0.01 at redemption. Note that there’s a $100 redemption minimum – substantially higher than the minimum of some competing cards.

You can redeem your miles via statement credit for just about any travel purchase, including airfare, car rentals, hotels, and more. You always get a 5% rebate when you redeem, so a 10,000 mile redemption results in a 500 point deposit back into your account. There’s a solid sign-up bonus of 50,000 miles when you spend $3,000 in 90 days, but watch out for the $89 annual fee.

  • Sign-up Bonus. When you spend $3,000 within the first 90 days of card membership, you get 50,000 bonus miles (worth $500).
  • Key Fees. The $89 annual fee is waived during the first year, and there’s no foreign transaction fee. Late and returned payments cost $37, while balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 3%. Cash advances cost $10 or 5%, whichever is greater.
  • Introductory APR. There is a 0% APR on balance transfers for 12 months, as long as the transfer is made within 45 days of account opening.
  • Other Perks. Barclaycard comes with a host of concierge services, including exclusive events and 24/7 travel booking.

10. Gold Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express

2 SkyMiles per $1 Spent on Delta Airfare; 1 SkyMile per $1 Spent on Everything Else

The Gold Delta SkyMiles Credit Card from American Express is an airline rewards card that earns you an unlimited 2 SkyMiles per $1 spent on Delta airfare and in-flight purchases. All other purchases earn 1 SkyMile per $1 spent. SkyMiles are worth as much as $0.0075 apiece, though redemption value varies by method. Redemption minimums start at 10,000 SkyMiles.

Although this card has a $95 annual fee, the sign-up bonus helps – 30,000 SkyMiles (roughly $225 value) when you spend $1,000 in 90 days. Low balance transfer fees and no foreign transaction fees help as well. And if you own a business, check out the Gold Delta SkyMiles Business Credit Card, which is virtually identical.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 30,000 Delta SkyMiles, worth about $225, when you spend at least $1,000 within 3 months of account opening. Separately, get a $50 statement credit when you purchase a Delta flight with your card within 3 months of account opening.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $95 annual fee, waived for the first year, but no foreign transaction fees. Balance transfers and cash advances cost the greater of $5 or 3%. Late and returned payments both cost $37.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. Cardholders always get priority boarding and first checked bag free. You also get a 20% discount (via statement credit) on all in-flight food, beverages, and entertainment purchases with Delta.

2 United Airlines Miles per $1 Spent on United Airfare; 1 Mile per $1 Spent on Everything Else

The information related to the United MileagePlus Explorer credit card has been collected by Money Crashers and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card.

The United MileagePlus Explorer Card is a straightforward airline rewards card that earns 1 United Airlines mile per $1 spent on all purchases, every day, and 2 miles per $1 spent on United airfare. Neither category comes with spending restrictions or caps, though there is a $95 annual fee to watch for. When redeemed for United Airlines airfare purchases, points are worth up to $0.02 apiece, with shorter flights generally boasting higher point values. Redemption minimums vary based on flight distance and cost – short-haul domestic flight redemptions start at 10,000.

If you like attainable sign-up bonuses, you’ll like United MileagePlus Explorer: When you spend at least $1,000 in 3 months, you earn 30,000 bonus miles.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 30,000 bonus United Airlines miles (worth up to $600) when you spend at least $1,000 within 3 months of account opening.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $95 annual fee, waived for the first year, and no foreign transaction fee. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 5%, while cash advances are the greater of $10 or 5%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. When you purchase flights with your United MileagePlus Explorer Card, you and a companion get a free checked bag. You always get priority boarding as well.

12. British Airways Visa Signature® Card

3 Avios Points per $1 Spent on British Airways and Partner Airfare

The information related to the British Airways Visa Signature Card has been collected by Money Crashers and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card.

The British Airways Visa Signature Card isn’t just for overseas travel. Every $1 spent on British Airways and select partner airfare and incidentals earns you 3 points – British Airways partners include Iberia and the OpenSkies alliance. You also earn 1 point per $1 spent on everything else.

Redeem your points for airfare purchases with British Airways and its partner airlines (including American Airlines) at variable point values. Shorter routes, particularly within North America, tend to be worth more. Redemption minimums vary based on route length. Be aware that there is a $95 annual fee.

If you can manage $30,000 in annual spending in any year, British Airways doubles your redeemed rewards on one flight, allowing a companion to come along.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 50,000 bonus Avios when you spend at least $3,000 within 3 months of account opening, an additional 25,000 bonus Avios when you spend at least $10,000 within the first year, and a further 25,000 points when you spend at least $20,000 within the first year.
  • Key Fees. The annual fee is $95. There’s no foreign transaction fee. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 5%, and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 5%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. If you spend at least $30,000 in any calendar year, you get a Travel Together ticket good for 2 years. The ticket entitles you to redeem accumulated Avios rewards for any flight at regular redemption rates, and then bring a companion along with no extra charge (in dollars or Avios).

13. Marriott Rewards® Premier Credit Card

5 Marriott Rewards Points for Every $1 Spent at Marriott, Ritz-Carlton & Starwood Hotels; 2 Points per $1 Spent on Airline, Rental Car & Restaurant Purchases

The information related to the Marriott Rewards Premier credit card has been collected by Money Crashers and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card.

The Marriott Rewards Premier Card is similar to the Ritz-Carlton Rewards Card, though its $85 annual fee is much lower. Every $1 spent at Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, and Starwood hotels worldwide earns you an unlimited 5 Marriott Rewards points, and you earn an unlimited 2 points per $1 for purchases made directly with airlines and rental car agencies – though not through online portals like Kayak and Expedia. Restaurant purchases also earn an unlimited 2 points per $1 spent, and all other purchases earn an unlimited 1 point per $1 spent.

Marriott Rewards points can be redeemed starting at 7,500 points. Their value varies depending on the property type they’re redeemed at – for instance, a Residence Inn in Birmingham, Alabama (regular room rates $40 to $100 per night), offers rooms for 7,500 points per night, while a similarly priced Fairfield Inn & Suites in Auburn, Alabama, requires 25,000 points per room-night.

Marriott Rewards Premier also has a very generous sign-up bonus: When you spend just $3,000 in the first 3 months of card membership, you get 80,000 Marriott Rewards points.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 80,000 bonus Marriott Rewards points, potentially worth more than $800, when you spend at least $3,000 within 3 months of account opening. Additionally, earn 7,500 Marriott Rewards points when you add your first authorized user and make your first purchase.
  • Key Fees. The annual fee is $85, and there’s no foreign transaction fee. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 5% and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 5%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. On your account anniversary, you get a credit equal to 1 free night’s stay at select Marriott hotels (Category 1-5).

5 Points per $1 Spent at Ritz-Carlton & Marriott Properties; 2 Points per $1 Spent on Airfare, Car Rentals & Restaurants

The information related to the Ritz-Carlton Rewards Card has been collected by Money Crashers and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card.

Ritz-Carlton Rewards earns you an unlimited 5 points per $1 spent at Ritz-Carlton and Marriott properties; an unlimited 2 points per $1 spent on airfare, car rentals, and restaurant purchases; and an unlimited 1 point per $1 spent on everything else. At the end of each year, your annual points earnings always get a 10% boost, no matter how much, or how little, you spend. Watch out for the hefty annual fee of $395.

Redeem points for free nights at most Ritz-Carlton and Marriott properties (excluding Ritz-Carlton EDITION properties), as well as airline miles with such partners as Lufthansa, vacation packages that include Ritz-Carlton and Marriott hotel stays, and various merchants’ gift cards. Redemption minimums start at 30,000 points for hotel redemptions and rise from there. Points are generally worth less than $0.01 apiece.

The Ritz-Carlton Rewards Card’s sign-up bonus is very nice: 2 free double-occupancy room nights at select Ritz-Carlton hotels when you spend at least $4,000 in 90 days. Other perks, which go a long way toward offsetting the cost of the annual fee, include a $100 annual hotel credit and a $300-per-year airline travel credit, good for incidental expenses and airport lounge memberships.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 2 free nights at participating Ritz-Carlton Hotels when you spend $4,000 within 3 months of account opening. This bonus is potentially worth up to $1,000, depending on the property you select.
  • Key Fees. The annual fee is $395. There’s no foreign transaction fee. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 3%, and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 5%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. The $300 annual travel credit can be used to pay for airplane seat upgrades, airport lounge access at one selected airport lounge, and baggage fees on any airline. The $100 hotel credit can be used for dining, recreation, and spa services, with any 2-night paid stay at participating Ritz-Carlton (not EDITION) properties. Also, when you stay at the Ritz-Carlton for up to 7 nights in a row, you’re entitled to an upgrade to Ritz-Carlton Club Level. A maximum of 3 upgrades are allowed per year.

5 IHG Rewards Points per $1 Spent at Intercontinental Hotels; 2 Points per $1 Spent on Gas, Groceries & Restaurants

The information related to the IHG Rewards Club Select Card has been collected by Money Crashers and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of this card.

The IHG Rewards Club Select Card earns you 5 IHG Rewards points per $1 spent at Intercontinental Hotel Group hotels, including Holiday Inn and Staybridge Suites. Purchases at restaurants, grocery stores, and gas stations earn 2 points to the dollar, while purchases everywhere else earn 1 point per $1 spent. There aren’t any spending caps or restrictions. However, the card does come with a $49 annual fee.

You can redeem points for hotel nights at select Intercontinental properties, including most Holiday Inns and Holiday Inn Expresses, plus gift cards and online merchandise purchases. Redemption minimums vary by redemption method and date, but start at 10,000 points for hotel nights. When redeemed, points are generally worth about $0.005 each, though that amount varies by brand. You get a 10% rebate when you redeem points, with no maximums. Rebated points drop back into your account. If you redeem 50,000 points, you see a 5,000 bonus in your account afterwards.

Another perk of the IHG Rewards Club Select Credit Card: 70,000 bonus points when you spend at least $2,000 within 3 months of opening your account.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 70,000 IHG Rewards points, good for up to $350 in stays at select InterContinental Hotels (including Holiday Inn), when you spend at least $2,000 within 3 months of account opening.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $49 annual fee, waived in the first year, and no foreign transaction fees. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 5%, and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 5%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. In addition to the 10% redemption rebate, you get 1 free night per year at select IHG hotels for as long as you remain in good standing. You also qualify for Platinum Elite status upon request.

16. U.S. Bank FlexPerks® Travel Rewards Visa Signature® Card

2 Points per $1 Spent on Cell Phone Purchases; 1 Point per $1 Spent on Everything Else

U.S. Bank FlexPerks Travel Rewards earns you 2 points per $1 spent on cell phone purchases and 1 point per $1 spent on everything else. Plus, each billing cycle, you automatically earn double points in one of 3 common spending categories – airline purchases, gas, or groceries, whichever you spend the most in during that cycle. Mind the $49 annual fee.

Redemptions start at 5,000 points, and points are worth about $0.02 each. You can redeem for airfare on more than 150 airlines, plus gift cards, statement credits, and merchandise purchased through the FlexPerks portal.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 20,000 bonus FlexPoints, good for up to $400 in flights and other travel purchases, when you spend $2,000 within 4 months of account opening.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $49 annual fee, waived for the first year, and no foreign transaction fee. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 3%, and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 4%. Late and returned payments cost $38 and $35, respectively.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. Every time you redeem FlexPoints for travel, you get a $25 airline credit good for in-flight purchases, baggage fees, and other incidental expenses.

Find out how you can apply for this card here.

3 ThankYou Points per $1 Spent on Airfare & Hotels; 2 Points per $1 Spent on Dining & Entertainment; 1 Point per $1 Spent on Everything Else

Citi Prestige is a generous, but pricey, travel rewards card that earns you an unlimited 3 ThankYou points per $1 spent on all airfare and hotel purchases, 2 points per $1 spent on dining and entertainment purchases, and 1 point per $1 spent on everything else. You can redeem points for a host of purchases and credits at Citi’s ThankYou shopping portal: airfare, hotels, gift cards, clothing, electronics, and online bill-pay credits. Redemption minimums and point values vary based on how you redeem. The best redemption value is usually airfare, with point value ranging up to $0.0125.

The Citi Prestige Card has a solid sign-up bonus: 40,000 ThankYou Points when you spend at least $4,000 in 3 months. The biggest drawback is the hefty annual fee of $450, but the lavish perks more than make up for it for big spenders or frequent travelers.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 40,000 bonus ThankYou points when you spend at least $4,000 within 3 months of account opening.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $450 annual fee ($50 extra for each additional authorized user), but no foreign transaction fee. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 3%, and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 3%. Late and returned payments cost $35.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. Cardmembers are entitled to complimentary access to American Airlines Admirals Club lounges, hundreds of other VIP airport lounges worldwide through Citi’s Priority Pass Select program, and a complimentary 4th night free at any hotel, worldwide. Also, enjoy a $250 air travel credit each year, good for American Airlines airfare and incidentals.

18. Expedia®+ Voyager Card from Citi

4 Expedia+ Bonus Points per $1 Spent on ExpediaTravel Purchases; 2 Points per $1 Spent on Dining & Entertainment; 1 Point per $1 Spent on Everything Else

Expedia+ Voyager is the bigger sibling of the Expedia+. You earn an unlimited 4 Expedia+ points per $1 spent on travel purchases made through Expedia’s portal, 2 points per $1 spent on entertainment and dining purchases, and 1 point per $1 spent on everything else. Redemption procedures and values are the same as the Expedia+ Card from Citi.

You do pay a price for your accelerated earnings though: a $95 annual fee. However, you automatically qualify for Expedia Gold Status, boosting your point earnings by 30% on all purchases.

  • Sign-up Bonus. If you spend $2,000 within 3 months, you get 25,000 Expedia+ rewards bonus points.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $95 annual fee and 3% foreign transaction fee. Late and returned payments run $35, while cash advances and balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 3%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. Card membership automatically entitles you to complementary Expedia Gold Status. Gold Status boosts your point earning power by 30% – plus it offers access to room upgrades and VIP amenities at more than 1,700 hotels worldwide. You also earn $100 total toward incidental purchases on any of 10 participating airlines each year.

19. Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® MasterCard®

2 AAdvantage Miles per $1 Spent on American Airlines Airfare

If you desire to carry the CitiBusiness / AAdvantage Platinum Select Card, but don’t qualify because you don’t own your own business, apply for the Citi / AAdvantage Platinum Select MasterCard instead. For every $1 you spend on American Airlines purchases, this card earns an unlimited 2 American Airlines AAdvantage miles. All other purchases earn 1 mile per $1 spent.

As with CitiBusiness / AAdvantage Platinum Select, you can redeem for virtually any purchase with American Airlines. Minimum redemption amounts and point values vary based on purchase type, but generally fall on either side of $0.01 (for instance, short-haul domestic one-ways require 7,500 to 12,500 points for non-preferred coach seats – usually about a $100 value). You always get an automatic 10% miles rebate. For example, 10,000 redeemed miles translate to a 1,000-mile deposit back into your account.

Take advantage of this card’s sign-up bonus by spending at least $1,000 within 3 months of opening your account. If you do, you earn 30,000 bonus miles. Just be aware of the $95 annual fee.

  • Sign-up Bonus. When you spend $1,000 within 3 months of account opening, you get 30,000 American Airlines AAdvantage bonus miles (generally worth around $300) in return.
  • Key Fees. The $95 annual fee is waived during the first year. There’s no foreign transaction fee, but late fees range from $15 to $39, depending on balance size. Balance transfers and cash advances both cost $5 or 3%, whichever is more.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. You always get a free checked bag for yourself and up to 4 companions, as well as Group 1 priority boarding on all American Airlines flights. Any in-flight purchase with American earns a 25% discount.

20. Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® Card

3 Miles per $1 Spent on Alaska Airlines Airfare & Other Purchases

If you regularly fly with Alaska Airlines or one of its partners, it’s hard to beat the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Card. Every dollar you spend on Alaska Airlines airfare and vacation packages earns you 3 Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan miles, with no caps or restrictions. All other purchases earn an unlimited 1 mile per $1 spent.

When you’re ready to redeem, your miles are good for Alaska Airlines airfare, seat upgrades, and other incidental purchases. You can also redeem for airfare and incidentals with any of the airline’s 12 global partners, such as LAN and Cathay Pacific. Point values generally range on either side of $0.01. Redemption minimums vary based on how you redeem, but start at 10,000 points for domestic flights.

The Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Card’s sign-up bonus is nice: 30,000 miles when you make $1,000 or more in purchases in the first 3 months. Although this card has a $75 annual fee, it comes with a $50 credit toward a new Alaska Airlines Board Room airport lounge membership.

  • Sign-up Bonus. 30,000 miles after spending $1,000 within the first 3 months, worth about $300.
  • Key Fees. There’s a $75 annual fee and 3% foreign transaction fee – which is unusual for an airline rewards card. Balance transfers and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 3%, while late fees run $37 and returned payments cost $27.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. You get your first checked bag free for yourself and up to 6 companions. Plus, companion airfare costs a maximum of $121, regardless of the actual ticket price.

21. Citi® Hilton Honors™ Reserve Card

10 Hilton Honors Points per $1 Spent at Hilton Hotels; 5 Points per $1 Spent on Airfare & Car Rentals

For every $1 spent on Hilton portfolio hotel stays, the Citi Hilton Honors Reserve Card earns 10 Hilton Honors bonus points. Every $1 spent on airfare and car rentals earns 5 Honors points. All other purchases earn 1 point per $1 spent, with no caps or minimums. This card comes with a $95 annual fee.

As long as your account is in good standing, you automatically earn Hilton Honors Gold Status, which entitles you to a free night on stays of 5 days or longer. Gold Status also entitles you to a point earnings boost of 25%, with no restrictions. Redeem your points for hotel nights and incidental purchases, such as spa treatments and dining, with variable redemption minimums (starting at 5,000 points) and point values (generally less than $0.01 apiece). Spend at least $2,500 within 4 months of account opening to earn 2 free weekend nights at select Hilton portfolio hotels.

  • SignupBonus. Earn 2 free weekend nights (standard room, double occupancy) at more than 4,000 Hilton portfolio hotels worldwide when you spend at least $2,500 within 4 months of account opening. Depending on the property you select, this bonus is potentially worth $500 or more.
  • Key Fees. There’s no foreign transaction fee, but the $95 annual fee isn’t waived during the first year. Late and returned payments cost $35 each. Balance transfers cost the greater of $5 or 3% and cash advances cost the greater of $10 or 5%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. When you spend $10,000 in a given year, you get an additional free weekend room night on your cardmember anniversary. Card membership also comes with 24/7 travel and event booking too. Extra perks include Citi’s Private Pass program, which gives you special access, VIP treatment, and other benefits at sporting events and concerts.

Best Travel Rewards Credit Cards (Business Cards)

22. Capital One® Spark® Miles Select for Business

1.5 Miles per $1 Spent on All Purchases; Few Restrictions on Redemption

Capital One Spark Miles Select for Business is a business credit card that earns you an unlimited 1.5 miles per $1 spent on all purchases, all the time. You can redeem accumulated miles in any amount for statement credits on virtually any travel purchase, including purchases with any airline and any hotel, at a standard point value of $0.01 apiece. Redemption minimums start at $25.

The Capital One Spark Miles Select Business Card has a lot of other perks too, including a sign-up bonus worth up to $200 in travel purchases, no annual fees or foreign transaction fees, and an unlimited number of employee cards (all of which accrue unlimited miles) at no charge.

  • Sign-up Bonus. When you spend at least $3,000 within 3 months of opening your account, you earn 20,000 bonus miles (worth $200).
  • Key Fees. There’s no annual fee, foreign transaction fee, or balance transfer fee (aside from the variable APR). Cash advances cost the greater of $5 or 3%.
  • Introductory APR. There is a 0% intro purchase APR for 9 months.
  • Other Perks. Capital One’s emergency assistance services offer up to $100,000 in reimbursements for trips and reservations cancelled due to unforeseen events, such as accidents and illnesses.

23. Capital One® Spark® Miles for Business

2 Miles per $1 Spent on All Purchases; Redeem for Virtually Any Travel Purchase

Capital One Spark Miles for Business is very similar to Capital One Spark Miles Select for Business, although it does have a $59 annual fee (unlike its cousin). You always earn 2 miles per $1 spent, regardless of how much you spend or what you buy. All redemption-related considerations, including the $0.01-per-mile value, are identical to the Spark Miles Select card. All in all, this is a great card for frequent travelers.

The sign-up bonus is nice, if a bit hard to attain: 50,000 bonus miles, good for $500 in travel purchases, with at least $4,500 spent in 3 months. And remember that, as a business credit card, the Capital One Spark Miles for Business isn’t open to consumers.

  • Sign-up Bonus. Earn 50,000 bonus miles (worth $500) when you spend at least $4,500 within 3 months of account opening.
  • Key Fees. The $59 annual fee is waived for the first year. There’s no balance transfer fee (aside from the APR) or foreign transaction fee, but cash advances cost the greater of $5 or 3%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no intro APR.
  • Other Perks. Add additional employee cards at no extra charge. When you need to cancel trips due to factors beyond your control, you’re covered up to $100,000.

24. CitiBusiness® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World MasterCard®

2 AAdvantage Miles per $1 Spent on American Airlines Airfare & Certain Select Categories

Need a business card that rewards you for travel as well as everyday purchases? When you spend $1 with CitiBusiness / AAdvantage Platinum Select on American Airlines, telecommunications, gas station, and car rental purchases, you earn an unlimited 2 miles. You earn 1 mile per dollar on all other purchases, with no restrictions or caps.

You can redeem your reward for American Airlines airfare and incidentals purchases. Minimum redemption amounts and point values vary based on purchase type. Airfare redemptions start at 7,500 points, and incidentals start at 500 points. Point values fall on either side of $0.01. This card does have a $95 annual fee, but there’s no foreign transaction fee – a nice perk for global travelers.

If you don’t own your own business, you probably won’t qualify for this card. Instead, apply for the Citi / AAdvantage Platinum Select MasterCard, which has very similar features and benefits.

  • Sign-up Bonus. When you spend at least $1,000 within 3 months of opening your account, you get 30,000 American Airlines AAdvantage bonus miles (worth about $300).
  • Key Fees. There’s a $95 annual fee, but it’s waived during the first year, and there’s never a foreign transaction fee. Late fees range from $15 to $39, depending on the size of the overdue balance. Balance transfers and cash advances cost the greater of $5 or 3%.
  • Introductory APR. There’s no into APR.
  • Other Perks. You always get 25% off in-flight purchases and priority (Group 1) boarding on American Airlines flights. Plus, the first checked bag is always free for you and up to 4 fellow travelers.

Most credit cards come with booklet-sized cardmember agreements, but travel rewards programs are particularly complicated. Before you complete your card application, take time to read the fine print. Pay particular attention to restrictions on how your card accumulates travel rewards, as well as when, where, and how you’re allowed to redeem them.

As a general rule, cards that offset travel purchases with statement credits are somewhat less complicated than cards that require you to redeem points or miles directly with merchants like hotels or airlines. However, the only way to find out for sure is to buckle down and pore over their terms and conditions statements.

What’s your preferred travel rewards credit card?

Editorial Note: The editorial content on this page is not provided by any bank, credit card issuer, airline, or hotel chain, and has not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, not those of the bank, credit card issuer, airline, or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.