View Your Pre-Approved & Pre-Qualified Credit Card Offers

Pre qualify for credit

Being pre-qualified or pre-approved doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be approved.

For those just wanting the links, here is the short list. Keep reading on for more information on all of the pre-qualifaction finders.

You can find out if you have “any special offers waiting for you” by going to https://www.americanexpress.com/ then clicking card offers and entering your full name, address and the last four digits of your social security number. You can view this page by:

  • Click “cards” in the top bar
  • Click “view all Personal and Charge cards”
  • Click “Your Special Card Offers”

You can view what offers you are pre qualified for with Bank of America by clicking here. You’ll need to enter your full name, address, birth-date and the last four digits of your social security number. You’ll also need to let them know what type of credit cards you’re interested in and if you’re already one of their online banking customers.

You can view this page from the homepage of the Bank of America website by:

  • Click “Bank” in the header, then click “Credit Cards”
  • Click “Prequalified credit card offers” in left sidebar at the bottom

To view your Barclaycard pre-qualified offers click here. You’ll have to provide your basic information (address, full name, social security number, how you rate your credit, what type of benefits you value most). If you see a screen that says “Congratulations ” then you are pre-approved for those offers, if you see a screen that says “Recommended” then you have no current pre-approved offers from them.

The CardMatch tool was developed by CreditCards.com in an effort to reduce the amount of websites you need to check for pre-qualified offers. They also sometimes run specials where the sign up bonuses are greater through their tool than elsewhere. You need to enter your full name and address, along with the last four digits of your social security number. Click here to check your offers with CardMatch. You can get to the CardMatch tool for the homepage of CreditCards.com by doing the following:

  • Click the card match tool on the front page

You can also check to see if you have any pre-qualified offers from chase by clicking here. You’ll need to provide your full name, address, zip code, city, state and last four digits of your social security number.

You can also access this page from the chase homepage. To do so follow these directions:

  • Click “Product And Services” in the header
  • Click “Credit Cards” in the drop down menu
  • Click “All Credit Cards” in the side menu
  • Click “Check for Pre-Qualified Offers”

the credit card section of the chase website, this is the third link in the left sidebar (screenshot below).

You can view all your pre-approved offers from citibank by clicking here. As always, you’ll need to enter your full name, address and last four digits of your social security number. You’ll also need to choose which credit card benefit is most important to you. To view this page from the citibank homepage follow these directions:

Credit One is a sub prime lender and as such most of their cards have high fees and interest rates. We’d suggest you look into a secured card instead of going with them, but they also have a pre-qualified card finder you can use by clicking here. You can reach this page from the homepage with the following directions:

  • Click “get pre-qualified” which is found in the right sidebar, second box down.

Finding out the offers you’ve been pre-approved for with Discover is simple, just click here and fill out: first name, last name, last four digits of your SSN and answer two simple questions.

You can also get to the above page by navigating to it from the discover homepage, to do so:

  • Click credit card home, which is the first link on the far left of the footer links (at the very bottom of the page)
  • Scroll to the middle of the page and click “See your personalized offer”
  • Fill out the information and view your personalized offers

US Bank recently re-added their pre-qualification checker, which you can view by clicking here. You’ll need to enter your full name, address and last four digits of your SSN. You’ll also need to tell them what you look for most in a credit card. You can find this page from the homepage with the following directions:

  • Click “Credit Cards & Prepaid Cards” which is the third link to the left in the header.
  • Click “Credit Cards” which is first link in the pop down menu
  • Click “Check for Recommended Offers” in the main body of the website

HSBC has removed their pre-qualification app.

We hope you found this post helpful, if you did why not let our readers know which credit cards you were pre-qualified for?

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pre qualify for credit

I am frequently assailed by unsolicited letters from various credit card companies informing me that I am pre-qualified for credit cards with various goodies such as no annual fee or 0% APR for around a year.

I already have a credit card with a respectable credit limit and I am not in the position where I will need additional credit to meet my financial obligations, now or in the foreseeable future. My existing credit card company has increased my credit limit a few times in the past year, and I currently see no reason to switch or close the account.

It is my understanding that the more available credit, the better. I am not looking to make major purchases, nor am I attempting to prolong unsustainable spending habits. I simply want to know whether I am either walking into a trap or denying myself credit that I may need in the future.

With regards to hard credit checks, I have had two in the past 6 months: one that resulted in a small consumer loan, and the other was for a loan which turned out to have unsatisfactory terms, so I turned it down.

Question part 1: If I accept the pre-qualified offer now, is there any significant downside in the short or long term?

Question part 2: If I wait a while, assuming my balance/credit ratio is unchanged or even improves during that time, would it still be a good idea to apply for a pre-qualified credit card, given that enough time has passed since my last hard credit check?

I'm lumping your questions back into one because the answers go together:

If I accept the pre-qualified offer now, is there any significant downside in the short or long term? If I wait a while, assuming my balance/credit ratio is unchanged or even improves during that time, would it still be a good idea to apply for a pre-qualified credit card, given that enough time has passed since my last hard credit check?

There might a downside, but probably not in your situation. If you accept one credit card, the following things are likely to happen:

  1. Most likely there will be a hard pull which will have a minor negative impact on your credit score. The impact will decrease over time until it falls off in 1-2 years.
  2. Your AAoA will decrease which will slightly lower your score in the short term, but has the potential advantage of increasing your comparative AAoA when you obtain new credit long term. (Because future new credit will be a proportionally smaller change to the denominator.)
  3. Assuming you don't increase your spending due to having the new CC, then your ratio will decrease because you will now have more available credit. This will increase your score. (Unless your current ratio is already close to 0%, but you mentioned you have a small consumer loan.)

Every situation is different, but in general, the net effect of the above 3 items for accepting one credit card (IMHO) is that your credit score will slightly increase because the decrease in ratio of your current debt will have a bigger impact on your score than the hard pull and AAoA change. (Except during the time of the hard pull and when the new card reports- which could take a month.)

Now, even if your score would slightly increase, that doesn't necessarily mean you should get the card, and it definitely doesn't mean you should repeat and keep getting more credit. At some point having multiple inquiries and the bigger drop in AAoA will start to have a bigger impact on your score. Furthermore, (outside of the psychological urge to spend when you have more credit), if you have too much available credit, a lender may be hesitant to extend more to you. This would depend on your income too, but the basic line of thinking is: "Based on your income, how much can you afford if you max out all of your available credit?" At some point you hit a limit and they either won't lend to you, or they will ask you to replace existing credit with their own (i.e. cancel some unused credit).

So how should you interpret all of this? In general, I like to have a main CC and one backup CC, so if you only have one card I'd consider getting one more in case you lose your main one or if the number is compromised and you have to disable it until you receive your new card in the mail. Outside of that, I'd ignore the rest of the offers because they aren't going to help that much and they could possibly hurt.

If you decide to get one more card, make sure you pick one that has no annual fee, and if you are shopping, you might as well pick one with good perks. Who knows- maybe you'll find one that is even better than the one you currently have and your current card will become the backup.