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10 Credit Cards for Low Income Group

Total annual income credit card

I am from low income group can I have a credit card? What is the minimum salary limit for getting a credit card? These are the most common questions asked by individual now a day. So, today let’s try to get an answer to this question.

Annual income and the credit score is a crucial factor in getting the credit card. If your income level is low or if you have defaulted in making payment of a loan, your chances of getting a credit card is less. A credit card company evaluates your application based on your repayment capacity. It is quite simple if your monthly salary is Rs 50,000 you will easily get a credit card. However, if your monthly salary is Rs. 10,000 Credit Card Company might refuse your credit card application.

However, a person with low income group can also get a credit card in India. In India credit card is available with a minimum salary limit of Rs 6250 per month. A credit limit of such credit card is very less. It is usually 3 times of the monthly salary. If you are working with a good company or the government your chance of getting a credit card is high.

So, here is 10 Credit Card option for Low income group.

10 Credit Cards for Low Income Group

1. India Card by Bank of India – Gross income 0.75 Lac per annum.

2. Canara Visa Classic – Minimum Income 1 Lac per annum. Maximum card usage limit is 3 Lac.

3. ICICI bank HPCL Coral Visa Credit Card – Minimum income 2.4 Lac per annum.

4. Kotak Fortune Gold Card – Minimum income should be 3 Lac per annum.

5. Andhra Bank Credit Card – Minimum Income 1.8 Lac per annum.

6. Bank of Baroda Titanium Card – Minimum Income 2 Lac per annum.

7. Corporation Bank Gold Card – Minimum Salary Income 1.8 Lac per annum.

8. Vijaya Bank Gold Credit card – Minimum Salary Income 1.2 Lac per annum.

9. HSBC Classic Credit Card – Minimum Salary Income 1.44 Lac per annum.

10. Axis Bank Insta Easy Credit Card – No Income Proof. Only fixed deposit of Rs 20,000 is required.

Documents required along with Credit Card application

1. Salary Slips for last 3 months

2. Income tax returns document

3. Latest bank statement or passbook showing salary credit entry

4. Address proof and ID proof

If you are already using a credit card or planning to take one make sure you never default on your payment. Making a payment on the due date will help you in two way you can save on interest and also build your good credit history. A good credit history helps you while applying for loan or credit card.


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Hindi Automati Pay Your Credit Card Bill Kaise Credit Card Ke Bill Ka Bhugtaan Karein

What Is Included In Household Income

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Average Credit Card Debt in America: 2016 Facts & Figures

Our researchers found the median debt per American household to be $2,300, while the average debt stands at $5,700. Combined data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Federal Reserve allowed us to dive deeper into credit card debt in the United States, and look beyond the face value of those two figures. Below you'll find some of the most prominent trends that emerged from the available data.

American Credit Card Debt Statistics & Key Findings - Updated May 2016

  • Average American Household Debt: $5,700. Average for balance-carrying households: $16,048
  • Total Outstanding U.S. Consumer Debt: $3.4 trillion. Total revolving debt:$929 billion
  • 38.1% of all households carry some sort of credit card debt.
  • Households with the lowest net worth (zero or negative) hold an average of $10,308 in credit card debt.
  • The Northeast and West Coast hold the highest average credit card debt – both averaging over $8,000.

Total annual income credit card

Average Credit Card Debt in America

The mean credit card debt of U.S. households is approximately $5,700, according to most recent data from the Survey of Consumer Finances by the U.S. Federal Reserve. This information comes from data collected up through to the year 2013, and represents the most reliable measure of credit card indebtedness in the United States. The "mean amount of credit card debt" considers balances that Americans above the age of 18 have on average, throughout the year.

Another method for estimating average credit card debt is to look only at indebted households - excluding who pay their balances in full on a monthly basis. To obtain this figure, we looked at data reported by the Federal Reserve for Outstanding Revolving Debt - we then divided that number by the number of card-carrying households each year. As of March 2016, the average credit card debt for these households is $16,048.

During the course of our study on average credit card debt, we observed some significant differences among different demographics and regions. The most prominent differences exist among peoples of different race, age, gender, and state of residence. In the following sections we explore these differences to see how average credit card debt varies among the population.

Average Credit Card Debt by Region

Average credit card debt varied widely by state or region. According to data from the credit reporting agency TransUnion, the typical Alaska residents carried the most credit card debt – an average of $6,910 – this is 23% more than Colorado, which is the next state carrying the highest average credit card debt.

The average householder in Iowa holds just $3,885 in credit card debt, which is almost half as much as the rest of the nation. North and South Dakota, and Nebraska were among other states which came in with low average credit card debt per household – the three held an average of $4,182.

To see the average credit card debt throughout the nation, use the interactive map below. Hover over a state in order to display its average. Light blue states have lower debt, while dark blue states have higher levels of credit card debt.

Average Credit Card Debt Throughout the United States

Credit card debt appears to peak for individuals who are between 45 and 54 years old - $9,096. Some of our surveys have shown that this group tends to be among the largest credit card spenders – likely due to the budgets they are operating with. Recent studies have shown this age cohort (commonly referred to as “Baby Boomers”) controls the largest portion of America’s disposable income.

Millennials and individuals over 74 years old held the least credit card debt. These two groups are also among the least likely to have a credit card, which can serve as a potential explanation behind the trend we are seeing here.

Average Credit Card Debt by Income

The greater the household income the higher the credit card debt. Individuals in the highest annual income percentile, 90th to 100th, had an average of $11,200 in credit card debt—nearly four times as much as households making the least. However, as a percentage of income, those on the lower end of the specturm carry more debt.

Average Credit Card Debt by Gender

Male householders carried significantly more credit card debt then their female counterparts. The mean credit card debt held by men is $7,407, whereas women tend to hold 22% less – with an average of $5,245.

Total annual income credit card

Various reports seem to indicate that women prefer the use of debit cards to credit cards. In our recent Survey of Credit Card Consumer Habits, we found that women were more likely to fall into the smaller spending categories, whereas more men tended to be big credit card spenders – 19% of men the men surveyed would spend $2,000+ per month, compared to just 8% of women.

Individuals who identified as white (with no Hispanic origin) carried an average of $7,942 in debt – the highest amount of any racial group. They were followed by Asians, with an average credit card debt of $7,660. Black householders carried the least debt, with an average of $6,172, which is 20% lower than the nationwide mean.

Total annual income credit card

Total Credit Card Debt in the United States

Debt arising from credit card use represents less than half of the total average unsecured debt held by Americans. In 2011, the average total unsecured debt was $21,281, and credit cards accounted for just 36% of that figure. For a clearer picture of America's indebtedness, it is critical to look at total outstanding debts - arising from both credit cards and other sources.

Every month, the Federal Reserve releases statistics regarding total outstanding debts in America – these are referred as “revolving” and “non-revolving” credit. Non-revolving credit refers to loans individuals are paying off over time, while revolving credit refers to an ongoing line of credit extended to a consumer, which they pay off and continually receive. For example, a mortgage is an example of non-revolving credit, since an individual with one will be slowly paying down the debt. Revolving credit is predominantly comprised of credit cards, which users pay down each month, and are immediately given a new line of credit upon payment.

The most recent data indicates that, as of March 2016, the current outstanding revolving debt in the United States is $952 billion. The majority of these debts originate from depository institutions (e.g. banks) - $754.4 billion is owed due to credit extended by these companies. The remainder of the credit debt owed to finance companies and credit unions - $53.5 billion and $48.3 billion respectively.

Average credit card debt is closely tied to the total outstanding revolving debt. Over the years, the two have risen together, exhibiting strong correlation (0.6). Over the last decade, average credit card debt has grown at a faster pace – raising by 52% since the year 2000. In that time, outstanding revolving credit has grown with exactly half that rate – increasing 26%.

Total annual income credit card

The above graph presents a single anomaly which occurred in 2005. During that time there was a severe drop in average credit card debt, despite total outstanding revolving debt continuing to rise. This outlier was likely due to the spike in bankruptcy filings in the United States around that time. A law went into effect at the end of 2005 which made it more difficult for individuals to declare bankruptcy. This resulted in a rush of filings before the law's deadline - over 2 million Americans had their debts forgiven that year due to these filings.

How Has Average Credit Card Debt In America Changed over The Years?

As discussed above, average credit card debt in America has been rising over the last decade. However, despite this, the average percentage of people holding credit card debt has been gradually decreasing. This tells us that the while average credit card debt is increasing, it’s not due to a greater number of individuals spending. Instead, in recent years, more people have been more heavily indebted.

In the year 2000, over half of the households in America had credit card debt. By contrast, in 2001, that figure fell to 38% - over 12 percentage points lower. Over this time, average credit card debt rose from $5,048 to $7,697. This means the average American today holds 52% more debt today than they did a decade ago.


The Best Cards for Bad Credit for 2017

This page includes analysis of our favorite cards from The Simple Dollar’s advertisers and the marketplace. Visit our advertiser disclosure to learn more.

What’s in a credit score? Well, it turns out, a lot! Maybe you just recently started establishing credit, or maybe you’ve had a few setbacks in the past few years, and your credit score reflects that. Bad credit doesn’t exclude you from owning a credit card, though. In fact, using a credit card responsibly is one of the best ways to build or rebuild credit. The best credit cards for bad credit offer less strict guidelines for anyone with less-than-perfect credit making it easier to get approved for and start using a credit card. Choose one of the secured or unsecured credit cards for bad credit on our list, make payments on time and in full each month, and keep your credit utilization low to watch your credit score improve over time.

The best credit credit cards for bad credit for 2017

Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit for 2017

Total annual income credit card

With quick pre-qualification, cash back on eligible purchases like groceries and gas, and no security deposit, the Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa® is our top pick for rebuilding your credit.

Our favorite credit cards for bad credit for 2017

There are two main types of cards for bad credit. Secured credit cards require a security deposit as collateral. Often, your credit limit will be equal to your deposit. While unsecured credit cards can be more difficult to qualify for, they usually offer lower ongoing fees and upfront charges. Take advantage of pre-qualification to find out if you’re likely to be approved.

  • No security deposit required. Get a 100% unsecured card that can help grow and build credit.
  • Focused on growing or rebuilding your credit? We report account activity to all three major credit bureaus each month to help keep your credit score up-to-date.
  • Find out if you're Pre-Qualified without harming your credit score. It's fast, easy, and secure.
  • Looking for more credit? Get credit line increase opportunities, a fee may apply
  • Get 1% cash back on eligible purchases including gas, groceries, and services such as mobile phone, internet, cable and satellite TV. Terms apply.
  • Your account is safeguarded against unauthorized charges with Zero Fraud Liability at no additional charge
  • Stay in-the-know about your account with custom email and text alerts that remind you of your payment due date, notify you when a payment posts, or warn you if your available credit runs low
  • Show off your style with a premium card design, a fee may apply.
  • Issuer: Credit One
  • Rewards Details: Get 1% cash back on eligible purchases including gas, groceries, and services such as mobile phone, internet, cable and satellite TV. Terms apply.
  • Annual Fee: $0-$99
  • Cash Advance APR: 18.90% - 25.90% Variable
  • Introductory APR: N/A
  • Introductory APR Period: N/A
  • Introductory Balance Transfer APR: N/A
  • Introductory Balance Transfer Period: N/A
  • Ongoing APR: 16.99% - 24.99% Variable

When it comes to the best credit cards for bad credit, one of our favorites is the Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa® for a number of reasons. If you have bad credit and aren’t sure if you’ll get approved, this card has a pre-qualification process that doesn’t dock your credit score. Once approved, you’ll also benefit from rewards. Cardholders can earn 1% cash back on everyday purchases, such as gas, groceries, mobile phone, internet, cable and more. Additionally, the card offers a low annual fee, free monthly credit score tracking, and reporting to all three credit agencies, as well as email and text alerts. Thanks to these features and perks, the Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa® is a card that works for just about anyone looking to rebuild their credit score!

  • Get pre-qualified without harming your credit score.
  • Don’t charge anything you couldn’t pay for outright. Budget to pay off your entire balance each month to build credit and avoid interest payments.
  • Use this card on eligible purchases like gas, groceries, and internet to earn cash back.

The Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa® does have an annual fee of up to $99. Fortunately, new card members can benefit from an initial $75 annual fee for the first year. Additionally, the cost is spread out in monthly increments instead of a lump sum.

If you’re searching for a credit card that’s more forgiving of a bad credit score and offers rewards, then the Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa® is one to consider. The combination of great features provided by this card makes it easy to earn rewards while also building your credit in the process.

  • Pre-qualification available with no impact to your credit score
  • Previous bankruptcy OK
  • Easy pre-qualification process with fast response
  • Free online account access (mobile friendly)
  • Protection from fraud, if your card happens to be lost or stolen
  • Accepted at over 35 Million Locations Worldwide!
  • Issuer: Genesis Bank
  • Sign Up Bonus: Easy pre-qualification process with fast response
  • Annual Fee: $0 - $99
  • Cash Advance APR: 29.9%
  • Foreign Transaction Fee: 1% of each transaction.
  • Introductory APR: N/A
  • Introductory APR Period: N/A
  • Introductory Balance Transfer APR: N/A
  • Introductory Balance Transfer Period: N/A
  • Ongoing APR: 23.9%

Anyone who has previously filed for bankruptcy should consider the Indigo® Platinum MasterCard®. A bankruptcy can stay on your credit report for seven to 10 years, making it difficult to move past it and rebuild your credit. Luckily, this card’s relaxed guidelines won’t necessarily disqualify you for a previous bankruptcy. If you’re still not sure if you’ll qualify, don’t worry. They offer a pre-qualification option to let you know your likelihood of getting approved (without a hard credit inquiry that could lower your score).

  • Answer a few pre-qualification questions to find out if you’re likely to be approved.
  • Pay your balance on time each month to strengthen your credit score and avoid the high penalty APR.
  • Once your credit score is where it needs to be, consider switching to a card that offers a rewards program.

The Indigo® Platinum MasterCard® does have an APR of 23.9% as well as an annual fee of up to $99. Your annual fee may be $0, $59 or $75 first the first year (then $99 afterward), depending on your credit profile and the severity of your credit score. For an option with no annual fee, consider the Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee.

Anyone who’s filed a bankruptcy knows that it can limit your credit options. That’s why the forgiving guidelines from the Indigo® Platinum MasterCard® make it a desirable option. There’s no security deposit required, and the small annual fee makes this card an affordable option for improving your credit score.

  • Quick pre-qualification available with no impact to your credit score
  • Easy pre-qualification process with fast response
  • Choose your custom card design - Free
  • Free online account access
  • Protection from fraud, if your card happens to be lost or stolen
  • Accepted at over 35 Million Locations Worldwide!
  • Previous bankruptcy OK
  • Issuer: Genesis Bank
  • Annual Fee: $35 - $99
  • Foreign Transaction Fee: 1% of each transaction
  • Ongoing APR: 23.90%
  • Penalty APR: 29.90%

The Milestone® Gold MasterCard® is another card that’s forgiving of a previous bankruptcy and won’t necessarily disqualify you if there’s one on your credit report. While the card does have an annual fee and possible account opening fee associated with it, it offers some other perks. You’ll benefit from a $0 cash advance fee during the first year (then $5 or 5% after that), as well as a 1% foreign transaction fee. Milestone also offers a pre-qualification option that won’t impact your credit score.

  • Take advantage of pre-qualification to check your eligibility without a hard inquiry on your credit score.
  • Budget to pay off your balance monthly (or bi-monthly!) to build credit and avoid the higher penalty APR.
  • After your credit score improves, make the switch to a card with a rewards program.

Depending on your credit profile, there may be some upfront fees associated with opening your account. Annual fees are based on your credit score: $35, $59, or $75 (then $99 after the first year). There may also be an account opening fee of $5, $25, or $50. Luckily, your first-year annual fee and account opening fee won’t total more than $75.

The Milestone® Gold MasterCard® has a lot of attractive features. It’s forgiving of a past bankruptcy, it offers $0 cash advance fees the first year and 1% foreign transaction fees, it doesn’t require a security deposit, and it’s backed by MasterCard®, allowing you to use it just about anywhere.

  • Checking Account Required
  • Fast and easy application process; response provided in seconds
  • A genuine VISA card accepted by merchants nationwide across the USA and online
  • Manageable monthly payments
  • If approved, simply pay a Processing Fee to open your account and access your available credit
  • Reports monthly to all three major credit bureaus
  • Select your favorite card design from our gallery, for free!
  • No-Fee credit line increase opportunities!
  • Issuer: Mid America Bank & Trust Company
  • Annual Fee: See Terms*
  • Cash Advance APR: See Terms*
  • Introductory APR: N/A
  • Introductory APR Period: N/A
  • Introductory Balance Transfer APR: N/A
  • Introductory Balance Transfer Period: N/A
  • Ongoing APR: See Terms*

Anyone who wants to take a disciplined approach to building their credit with minimal bells and whistles should consider the Total VISA® Unsecured Credit Card. The card makes it easy to spend a little while having a big impact on your credit score. Your initial credit limit is capped at $300 (minus fees), meaning you can spend just $100 a month (to keep your credit utilization low) and pay it off in full and on time to boost your credit score.

  • This card has an initial credit limit of $300. To keep your credit usage low, think carefully before making any large purchases.
  • Pay your entire balance monthly (or more often) to avoid interest at this card’s high APR.
  • Once your credit score improves, switch to a card with fewer fees and a rewards program.

There are a number of fees associated with the Total VISA® Unsecured Credit Card. You can expect an annual fee of $75 for the first year (then $48 after that), an $89 processing fee, as well as $6.25 monthly service fee ($75 total, waived the first year). Make sure to pay your balance off in full and on time each month to avoid the $29.99% APR and a late payment fee of up to $38.

The Total VISA® Unsecured Credit Card isn’t for everyone, but if you want to take a disciplined approach to building credit, or you’re cautious about starting out with a high credit limit, you’ll want to consider this card. If you use it responsibly and keep your credit utilization low, this card can be a valuable tool for rebuilding your credit.

  • Issuer: Discover
  • Rewards Details: 2% cash back at restaurants & gas stations on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter. 1% cash back on all your other purchases.
  • Annual Fee: $0
  • Balance Transfer Fee: 3%
  • Cash Advance APR: 25.99% Variable
  • Introductory APR: N/A
  • Introductory APR Period: N/A
  • Introductory Balance Transfer APR: 10.99%
  • Introductory Balance Transfer Period: 6 months
  • Ongoing APR: 23.99% Variable

If your credit score requires that you consider secured credit cards, then you’ll be happy to know there’s a lot to love about the Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee (that’s why we named it our best overall secured credit card)! Your credit limit is equal to your security deposit, so you will need to come up with the initial deposit. Once you’re a cardholder, though, you’ll benefit from 2% cash back at restaurants and gas stations (up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter), plus 1% cash back on all other purchases. Other benefits include automatic dollar-for-dollar cash back matching at the end of the first year and the possibility to have your security deposit refunded after eight months.

  • Monitor your FICO® Credit Score for free in your account or on your monthly statement.
  • Pay off your balance on time and in full. Starting at seven months, Discover will review your credit management across all credit cards and loans (including those backed by other banks.) If your accounts are in good standing, Discover may refund your security deposit.
  • Use this card at restaurants and gas stations to earn extra cash back.

You will need to come up with an initial deposit of at least $200 (up to $2,500, depending on the credit limit you’re approved for). If your credit score is limited but not severely damaged, you may want to consider a card without a security deposit, like the Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa®. (You can check to see if you pre-qualify first).

While a security deposit is required, the Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee makes up for it with no annual or monthly fees, plus other perks. Benefits like cash back rewards and cash back matching make this card our top choice among secured credit cards.

  • Best for members rebuilding or establishing credit.
  • Determine your own credit limit ($250 to $5,000) with an interest-earning CD.
  • No foreign transaction fees when you travel outside the United States.
  • Issuer: USAA Savings Bank
  • Annual Fee: $35
  • Balance Transfer Fee: 3%
  • Cash Advance APR: 10.90% to 20.90%
  • Foreign Transaction Fee: 1%
  • Ongoing APR: 10.90% to 20.90%
  • Penalty APR: None

Military members and their families should consider the USAA Secured Card® American Express® Card, since it has some of the best features of any secured card. You’ll benefit from a small annual fee of $35, low variable APR rates, no penalty APR, no foreign transaction fee, and super-low 4% APR during deployment or PCS. All of these features make the USAA Secured Card® American Express® Card a valuable resource to servicemen and women as well as their families.

  • Make as large an initial deposit as possible. Your deposit will determine your credit limit (up to $5,000.)
  • Leave your security deposit in your CD for the full two-year term to avoid early withdrawal penalties.
  • Pay your balance on time and in full to boost your credit score.

A security deposit of at least $250 (up to $5,000) is required, meaning you’ll need to come up with that initial cost. However, that deposit will be placed in a two-year interest-earning certificate of deposit (CD) that earns you money over time.

If you’re a member of the armed forces and can put down the security deposit, you’ll find there’s a lot to love about the USAA Secured Card® American Express® Card. While the card does offer a number of perks, you can also feel confident that you’re building or rebuilding your credit with responsible use.

Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit: Summed Up

Credit card application “rules” for when you have poor or bad credit

It may seem contradictory, but using a credit card is one of the best ways to begin repairing any credit mistakes. The trick is to pick a card for poor or bad credit (like the ones above) and follow a few simple “rules.”

Here’s what you need to consider before applying:

  • Know your credit score.
  • Decide if a card or a short-term loan for bad credit would be better.
  • Sign up for a credit monitoring service.
  • Choose your card carefully. A low credit score will decrease your likelihood of being approved for top rewards, travel, or cash back cards — and a hard inquiry during the application process could hurt your credit, whether or not you’re approved.
  • Consider using a prepaid debit card if you find yourself falling behind.

First and foremost, you need to understand what your credit looks like, and that starts by knowing your credit score and getting a credit report. The Federal Trade Commission allows you to request a free credit report from one, or all three, of the major credit reporting bureaus—Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion—once every 12 months. You can request a copy from one or all of these bureaus online at AnnualCreditReport.com or by calling 1-877-322-8228.

Your credit report will show your entire credit history and give you an idea of where you can improve. For instance, do you make late payments regularly? If so, you’ll want to set up automatic payments or payment reminders. Your credit score is determined by several “good” and “bad” credit actions.

Good for credit:

  • Making payments on time each month.
  • Paying the minimum or full balance.
  • Establishing a long credit history.
  • Keeping a low credit utilization rate.
  • Paying down or off a credit card.
  • Disputing any errors on your credit report.
Bad for credit:
  • Making late payments or skipping deadlines.
  • Maxing out a credit card or going over the limit.
  • Keeping a high running balance on your card.

Additionally, you may want to consider a credit monitoring service to better understand your credit report and protect against future negative impacts from fraud or identity theft.

Secured vs. unsecured: making the right choice

As mentioned above, there are two types of credit cards—secured and unsecured. In most cases, your “ideal card” will come with low fees and the potential for rewards. That is why we recommend the Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa®.

If you’re still not sure which to choose, consider these strategies:

  • Strategy #1: Try to get an unsecured credit card. Unsecured credit cards are usually harder to qualify for but come with lower fees and upfront costs. If you’re worried about rejection or a hard inquiry on your credit report, try pre-qualification first. The Credit One Bank® Unsecured Platinum Visa® offers a pre-qualification option with just a few simple questions.
  • Strategy #2: Go secured for a limited time. If you don’t quite qualify for an unsecured card just yet, start with a secured card. Choose either of the secured cards on our shortlist, and you can get your deposit back if you pay your balance in full and on time, which will also build your credit. Also, secured cards aren’t forever—once your credit starts improving, you can “upgrade” to an unsecured account (preferably with a rewards program).
  • Strategy #3: Use a prepaid debit card as a short-term solution. If you don’t have a bank account, you might have trouble qualifying for a secured credit card. In this case, start with a prepaid debit card for a limited time. Unlike secured and unsecured credit cards, these types of cards give the appearance of credit but are only funded when you make a deposit. However, since they don’t extend credit, you can’t rebuild credit over time, and they are known to have various fees attached.

Research more credit cards to rebuild your credit

Below is a directory with the most popular credit cards for bad credit in the marketplace. These include the best secured credit cards and unsecured credit cards for lower credit. Sometimes, credit card issuers bring new cards to the market and sometimes they choose to discontinue certain cards. All changes are reflected in real-time in this directory.

Directory of credit cards for bad credit

To develop an overall rating for each credit card shown, I analyzed the features of each card. After that, I considered the importance level of each feature my measuring how much it matters to the average consumer who is researching credit cards for bad credit. The most heavily weighted features of a credit card for bad credit are Deposit Requirement, Ease of Qualification, and Initial Credit Limit. I also considered the Credit Reporting, Annual Fee, and APR associated with each card.

The rating I developed for each card provides an objective basis for comparison based on the features we decided are most valuable to the majority of customers with below-average credit.

Sort, filter, or search for what matters most to find the best credit card for you.